Quantcast
So how do REALLY use a polishing stone?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: So how do REALLY use a polishing stone?

  1. #1

    So how do REALLY use a polishing stone?

    Hey folks,

    This is probably an elementary question, but hey, I'm an elementary sharpener-guy. I got my first 'real' polishing stone, a Naniwa 5000x superstone. Whenever I use it I only seem to make my edges DULLER. I know that the more stones one uses in their progression, the more potential for inconsistency, edge rounding, etc, but I'm wondering how do you more experienced sharpeners really use very high-grit stones? I was using a Chosera 3000 as my last stone....results seem to be good, and it was hard enough that it still cut, so I could still create a little burr and have some kind of an idea as to what I was doing..but that stone has cracked pretty badly. I get a nice toothy edge off my Chosera 1000, but whenever I try to take it to the next level I go BACKWARDS. So, as the title suggests, how does one REALLY use a polishing stone? Is it just a few light strokes on each side and call it bueno? Does it take longer, more extensive work to really polish? Do you just use edge trailing strokes to de-burr and polish at the same time? This is getting very frustrating, since I know a 5000 grit stone has a place in my lineup, but I hate putting work into my knives at lower grits just to make their edges mediocre with the higher grit.

    Also, what grit flattening stone should one use on a soft, high-grit stone like the naniwa? Rookie sharpener=gauges in soft stone=need fixing.

    Any and all help would be appreciated...sort me out!

    T
    "Suck less every day."

  2. #2
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,034
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  3. #3
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,487
    These days, I basically only use a Gesshin 8k on an edge after the initial sharpening, and only use a coarser stone for chip repairs, thinning, or sharpening somebody else's knife. There really isn't a secret, in my opinion, other than making sure you are working the edge, working it enough to put an even edge, and making sure that your edge has been properly de burred. I get aggressive and long lasting edges from the 8k.

  4. #4
    Do you raise and remove a burr with each progressively finer stone or just the coarser grits.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,034
    You always have to remove the burr/wire edge in order to expose the blades true cutting edge.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    charlotte, nc
    Posts
    1,344
    just get another chosera 3000

  7. #7
    For me, it's been a trial and error thing.

    I think we've all been in a similar situation in our sharpening journeys. If not rounding the edge on a higher grit, we over polish and end up with an edge that quickly dulls on us - especially if it's a professional setting on poly boards.

    Every stone is different and I don't have experience with the Naniwa 5k SS, but here are some things that have helped me:

    - Make sure you are staying consistent with your angles, not just while you're on that stone, but throughout your progression.

    - Don't jump up stones until you are completely satisfied with your previous stone's edge.

    - Ease up on pressure. The heavy work is already done. You've already abraded steel and (hopefully) have a fresh, clean edge. All you are doing are refining it. Keep that in mind. Plenty of higher grit stones will still cut quickly, so I'm not saying to baby it & merely glide your knife on the surface - but until you feel comfortable, take it slow & easy.

    - If the stone is muddy, build up a slurry before you start working on the edge. By either using a plate/nagura, or, if you're like me and don't care too much about your aesthetics, lay the knife flat and put pressure/polish. I find this helps most stones work quicker and will make it a bit more forgiving.

    - Don't spent too much time on it. Raise a small, consistent burr on each side, deburr, and then slowly and carefully finish by stropping (edge trailing strokes). Maybe deburr, strop a little to weaken whatever might still be left, deburr again, and then spend more time stropping on your clean edge. This plays into being happy with your previous stones edge.

    Best of luck! When I started sharpening I had the same problem on my Shapton Glass Stones. I was (relatively) happy with my 1k edge, but when I went to 4k I always felt like I was doing more harm then good. I ended up getting a Rika 5k which gives much better feedback, is softer, muddier, and cuts quick. But it was also an issue of my technique.

  8. #8
    Thanks guys. ThEoRy, I think you've actually passed this video on to me before, thanks for the reminder since I know it's got a lot of good stuff in it. I generally think I'm pretty good about removing the wire edge/deburring completely. I strop on felt loaded with diamond between grits and draw through a felt block. I do my best to be consistent with my burrs, as much as I can anyways (I suppose I can always be better, but it's not like it's something I don't keep in mind). The only burr I really raise is on the 1k...I used to raise it also on the 3k chosera, but now that I don't have anything in between I'm just trying to do the heavy lifting with the 1k and hope to polish with the 5k. Would you guys recommend have a jump in between, like a 2k or replace my 3k? Is it actually important? Thanks again for the help.

    T
    "Suck less every day."

  9. #9
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,034
    I just go right from bester 1200 to Rika 5k. Just take your time and make sure you are hitting the edge properly. Use the magic marker trick to be sure you are abraiding the steel from the top of the bevel down to the edge.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  10. #10
    I rub my knife on it.
    "Those who say it can't be done are always pasted by those doing it"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •