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Thread: doing it wrong

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim0mit View Post
    I had this happen to me until i picked up a piece of balsa from a craft store and a yellow crayon (flexcut gold) from a woodworking store. Stropping will help tremendously in removing your wire edge and the setup i listed set me back all of $10
    Can you explain what how you use this stropping setup?

  2. #12
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    I would add that you should strop at a higher angle than the one you sharpen at.

    Here's another method I'm going to spend some time playing with:
    I'm going to use a 90 deg angle and just remove the jacked-up metal at maybe the 1k level or so and then go up in grit to 6k or so. I will then sharpen it at ~15 deg down to an edge without raising a burr. If it works, it should be the strongest edge possible, no? The toughest part will be grinding evenly across the entire edge and figuring out when to stop grinding a particular section at any given grit.

  3. #13
    tk59, if you can sharpen a knife from 90deg to push cutting without raising a single burr(as verified by high powered microscope photos from consistent areas of the edge), I'll be here.

    I'll also be calling the folks at History Channel, because the Ancient Aliens people need to see what race of Star Gods gave you this power, and what it means for humanity.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by AnxiousCowboy View Post
    Can you explain what how you use this stropping setup?
    Think of stropping on balsa like a making your own stone. Bare Balsa would be considered 0 microns, because it is so smooth. You pick a micron size, put that kind of compound on the balsa, now it's a "stone"(one you can't push a knife edge-first on or get wet) at the micron size of the compound.

    It works brilliantly.

    However, stropping on a slick surface like balsa can remove burrs, but only by abrading them down with the power of the compound. Leather/felt/etc has enough friction and "grab" to pull at the metal, it is basically more aggressive. Imagine being pulled along a sidewalk(balsa), vs being pulled along a giant concrete coated mattress(leather).

    Don't tell anyone, but I've used compounds and balsa to make faux stones I've used on Kata-ha knives to great effect. You just get lots of compound on your fingers and an ugly polished finish.

  5. #15
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    So what is Flexcut Gold crayon?

    Any pictures of your guys' stropping setups and videos of you in action?

  6. #16
    The Gold crayon he referred to is a buffing compound, commonly sold at hobby and hardware stores, which are pretty low grit for stropping, compared to what is available. You can get "Jeweler's Rouge" at higher grits, but the problem with these is that they are created and optimized for powered applications, where you have lots of inertia behind it. Compounds sold specifically for knife sharpening work CRAZY fast, even when working by hand.

  7. #17
    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    Edges in a commercial kitchen takes a beating and a half. I have never went through a full shift without at least honing and I've done it with at least 12 different steels from good makers. I think think you are doing well if you can get by throughout a shift. Not to say that it should be dull.

    if you are looking for the exact same edge at the end of your shift as when you started, that is not going to happen. edge retention is at this point subjective to a lot of variables, ie: length/number of cuts, what is being cut, force on cutting board, type of cutting board, lateral impact, etc. etc.

    get a digital microscope or powerful magnifying glass to inspect your edges before and after shift and during sharpening as just one way to learn and get better.

  8. #18
    I like the flexcut gold precisely because it is a high grit level. It leaves a toothy edge that will last me the whole shift. I cut the balsa down so it works in a rubber steel rod stone holder and will thus fit in my knife roll.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    tk59, if you can sharpen a knife from 90deg to push cutting without raising a single burr(as verified by high powered microscope photos from consistent areas of the edge), I'll be here.

    I'll also be calling the folks at History Channel, because the Ancient Aliens people need to see what race of Star Gods gave you this power, and what it means for humanity.
    Yeah, I don't expect it to be completely burr-less the entire length of the edge, lol. I also expect it to take quite a while (totally impractical). It's more of an interesting exercise. Frankly, I'm pretty confident that I can achieve an edge that push-cuts paper, etc. this way. I doubt I'll have the patience to reach falling through tomato type sharpness. I doubt this type of edge would be much more robust that my normal edge. That's what I love about this forum. This is pretty much a useless exercise but some of us are actually interested. Thank you, Eamon.

  10. #20
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    This has happened to me a few times with VG10 knives. I think I simply wasn't spending enough time in the mid-range stones and was trying to rush the sharpening a little. I also thinned mine to 10 degrees then put a 15 degree microbevel and it made a massive difference in performance.

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