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Thread: Hakata Santoku knives anyone?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Matus View Post
    I find the design interesting - this could be a knife that can do similar work like nakiri as it should have nice chopping properties, but it still has a very usable tip.

    Since I have not found particularly much on this knife design around here (or elsewhere) - I would like to ask what other think about it - is it just a 'gimmick' design or do you find it useful? Any first hand experience?
    After using mine at work for a few days I think it is more a relative of a Nakiri than a Santoku, in use at least.
    When I prepare vegetables I use a rocking motion, although only a slight one it is enough to see the tip catching the surface of the cutting board, something I hadn't expected.

    I wouldn't say it is a gimmick design at all, which is a relief as there are some out there, I think this design brings some versatility to a Nakiri type knife.
    The tip design makes it really useful, more than on any other knife I have used, it allows the knife to do precision work and at a length of 165 up to 180 the knife is short enough that you retain control to execute it accurately.

    I think anyone who enjoys using a Nakiri or a Santoku might find this tip design to be a great innovation while retaining the practical features of those knives.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Thank you for the feedback - it sounds really good. Could you also comment on the blade profile, stiffness, weight ballance, etc ...?

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Matus View Post
    Could you also comment on the blade profile, stiffness, weight ballance, etc ...?
    One of the things I like about this knife is the weight, I know Yoshikane knives are known for being a bit tougher than some others and are often used as workhorse blades but when I tried a 240mm Gyuto a few year ago I didn't like it because I like knives to become more nimble the larger they get, mainly due to issues of fatigue and control.

    But when using the tip for more detailed work I find the weight is perfectly judged to balance between control and fatigue, but of course that will be subjective, however having used many different Santoku and Nakiri over the years the weight is definetly higher than average.

    Due to that fact the blade is stiff and strong and there will never be any concerns about warping, this will hold up to a lot I expect.

    Another thing I love about it is the balance is right on the join between blade and bolster, right where I like it and every custom handle I have had done by Daniel O'Malley has come to me like that, one of a great many reasons I consider his work to be fantastic.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Thank you! That sounds all very nice. I am seriously considering ordering one western blank (that is what EE still should be able to get) and having some nice custom handle made for it.

    Could you tell us a few more words about how does the knife performs o different vegetables? How is stiction & wedding? Thank you.

  5. #25
    I have prepared a wide array of vegetables and even on a Swede I had no problems, it peeled the skin away with ease, gliding through and even splitting it in half was no problem, it did not wedge, and if it can manage that then it has passed one of the hardest tests in my opinion.

    I did have to give it a bit more a push that normal but I was using the knife with the factory edge, which while good, is of course not realizing the blades full potential, so after some care on the stones it will be up to any task.

    I have not encountered any sticking at all so far, not with tomatoes, cucumber, lettuce or onion, no doubt the hammer finish plays a part in that but again the tip becomes useful for things like tomato and cucumber as when slicing with that part of the blade only a small amount of the blade remains in contact with the produce, so sticking becomes a non-issue entirely.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Thank you, that is very much appreciated

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