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  1. #1
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    Cutting the Cable

    Decided to stop getting cable TV and installed an antenna on the roof of my new place. Over-the-air, Hulu, Netflix and Amazon are now my TV options. I also did Ooma for my telephone service.

    I'm sick of telecom companies with their hefty taxes, creeping rates, and bad service.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

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    Not sure yet. It is hooked up in an empty house. A couple of years ago I downgraded to the most basic cable and didn't miss it all, so this was the next step. The cost of antenna wired to two locations was $550. I also got a Tivo with lifetime subscription $580 (after promotion that records antenna signals. And Netflix and HuluPlus each cost $8 per month as well.

    So there is an initial investment cost and some subscription services, but overall I will be saving around $100 per month. It will pay itself off after about a year, plus Tivo units with lifetime subscriptions have a good resale market. I could probably recover $100-150 after 4 years if I want to sell it and upgrade.

    The one nice thing is that the HD TV over-the-air (in addition to being free) is a higher quality than those same channels through cable companies as they don't have to compress the signal.

    I do definitely have fewer TV viewing choices, but oh well, who needs to be watching so much TV. If there is a TV show I really want to watch I can rent the episodes off of iTunes or Amazon.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

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    Nice I haven't watched t.v for years any show I want to watch can be found online and you can watch it whenever you want.

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    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    We dropped cable in late 2010. Don't miss it. Put an antenna up in the hubby's closet on the second floor and patched it in to the cable wiring. (Cost less than $40.) We probably have fewer outages with the antenna than we did with cable. We get the big 3 networks, fox, pbs, and a couple local channels. Since then if we go to a hotel with cable, we flip through the channels and see that we aren't missing anything. Right now I need to go up and adjust the orientation of the antenna--it got knocked askew and we aren't getting PBS now, but generally it's been great. For movies we get DVDs from the library. The library is also a good way to get tv shows--we check out a season at a time on dvd, and watch with no commercials. Plus you can replay when your spouse insists on talking at a critical moment in the show.

    Haven't made the jump with the phone yet.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

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    I did the same thing this year with an HD digital antenna and haven't missed much--but I cannot figure out for the life of me how to get NBC, ABC, or CBS. Fox, PBS, a whole lotta religious programming, and some others come through just fine. Drinky, any ideas?

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    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Have you tried www.antennaweb.org? You enter your address, and they tell you the direction you need to point your antenna for different stations.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

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    Quote Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post
    I did the same thing this year with an HD digital antenna and haven't missed much--but I cannot figure out for the life of me how to get NBC, ABC, or CBS. Fox, PBS, a whole lotta religious programming, and some others come through just fine. Drinky, any ideas?
    I just called this guy in MSP and he did all the signal testing/orientation for me. The religious programming is broadcast at a very weak signal off of the IDS building, so that stuff comes in pretty weak for me. Too bad huh.

    All my network channels come in really well along with the four tpt (PBS) stations.

    One can also consider Aereo when it comes. Bascially you rent a DVR/antenna and they are expecting to come to MSP within the year (I think).

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Decided to stop getting cable TV and installed an antenna on the roof of my new place. Over-the-air, Hulu, Netflix and Amazon are now my TV options. I also did Ooma for my telephone service.

    I'm sick of telecom companies with their hefty taxes, creeping rates, and bad service.

    k.
    I think you mean you are tired of the government taxes, and the cable companies creeping rates and bad service.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill13 View Post
    I think you mean you are tired of the government taxes, and the cable companies creeping rates and bad service.
    I wouldn't want to get into a discussion about how America has achieved a very mediocre to poor telecommunications infrastructure after trailblazing the industry for decades, but needless to say, bad government policy and bad companies have taken our fine country to new low-speed limits.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

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