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  1. #11
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Here are some examples of some of the best work in the world.





    Each a little different but they all accomplish the task beautifully. The Masamoto (my fav) is on the bottom and in the middle spine pick.

  2. #12

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    You like the Masamoto better than both Mizuno's?

  3. #13
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    The Mizuno suminigashi is my most used all arounder, the Mizuno honyakis as beautiful as they are just aren't my style. The Masamoto has the best lines, geometry and balance for pure cutting performance IMO.

  4. #14

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    WOW, that second pic is awesome. The first pic answers some of the questions I have but who knew I would spend ten minutes looking at a pic of three knives stuck into a potato

  5. #15

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    As you can see from salty's first pic, having the tip below the bottom of the bolster is generally a good place to start. The Kramer (top) and Masamoto (bottom) are also good examples on how to bring the spine down to the tip to make the tip thin and nimble. The Devin is the prototype I believe, and newer versions also have a little bit thinner tip, without such a drastic transition from tip to spine. Angling the handle up, like mentioned before, is achieved by not having the edge and spine run parallel to each other. If the edge gradually gets closer to the spine, while still being flat, the handle will angle up. Just put the edge on a cutting board with the heel in contact with the board, and then look at it from the side. How much angle on the handle is up to you, but at the least it should be a smidge higher than parallel with the board.

    I never noticed before how similar the Kramer and Masamoto are. Other than the little flair Bob puts on his choils and the sharp right angle of the Masamotos, the Kramer is just a little more bullnosed than the Masamoto.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #16
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    It wasn't by accident. Still the best knife Kramer has made. IMHO.

    On topic, your observations are right on. I'd like to point out the flat spots proximal to the heal. Then the belly transition to the "sweet spots" aka relative flat spots near the tip. They are most pronounced in the Masamoto and Devin. (I acknowledge the shape is a copy of something else but the grind is stellar).

    The transition belly has to be subtle. One reason being is that alot of work gets done on that piece of blade. It is also the most efficient part of the blade.

  7. #17
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    Another thing, I'm sure the Kramer was/is great but I start to lose that light-saber feeling once the blade gets much taller than 50 mm. I don't think I'd go for something taller than maybe 55 mm and my faves are all sub-52mm heel to spine.

  8. #18

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    The Zwilling Kramer feels pretty lightsaber-y. It being really thin and perfectly balanced certainly help, but if really tall blade heights are a total killer for you, it may not help completely.

    At the same time it does make me wish it was 10mm shorter so it could be a Ferrari instead of a Corvette (or whatever super fast/fast car analogy you prefer).
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  9. #19
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    I'd say it's the other way around. The shorter knives (heel to spine) feel like the small, light sports car-types that can hug any curve (or a light saber). The taller ones feel like the heavier, more beastly, less, agile ferrari-types.

  10. #20

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    Yeah, thats what I was saying. I meant I wished it was 10mm shorter at the heel (not in length) for the nimble and fast ferrari feel.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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