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Thread: Looking for good Horseradish..

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    I use Fresh Fruit in all preserves. Really cuts down on off colors even reduces mold spores. Great for keeping fresh garlic paste too stable too
    Have you ever used this for horseradish?

    I'm just asking for a "yes" or "no" answer.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #12
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Yes Mike. Try a batch with and a batch without and see what you think.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Yes Mike. Try a batch with and a batch without and see what you think.
    No thanks. I don't add preservatives to my foods like you do.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #14
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Mike it's an antioxidant as is vinegar, salt, citrus, tomato, vinegar, soy sauce..
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  5. #15
    Whole Foods has Lou's Organic for 3.99 a jar!

  6. #16
    daveb's Avatar
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    In FL my go to brand is "Seminole". Avail at most grocery stores across state and have bought it in GA.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  7. #17
    Senior Member hobbitling's Avatar
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    Horseradish takes attention, timing is very important.

    When you shred the horseradish, you break open cells and start a chemical reaction. Enzymes are released which start producing the "spicy" flavor.
    The enzyme breaks down sinigrin to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil).

    the reaction will continue until you add something acidic, like vinegar, which de-activates the enzyme.

    So the longer you let the shredded horseradish sit before adding the vinegar, the hotter it will get. I know people who use a stopwatch to get consistent results.

  8. #18
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbitling View Post
    Horseradish takes attention, timing is very important.
    When you shred the horseradish, you break open cells and start a chemical reaction. Enzymes are released which start producing the "spicy" flavor.
    The enzyme breaks down sinigrin to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil).
    the reaction will continue until you add something acidic, like vinegar, which de-activates the enzyme.

    So the longer you let the shredded horseradish sit before adding the vinegar, the hotter it will get. I know people who use a stopwatch to get consistent results.
    Thank You for this information.
    I grew my own and grated one of the roots.
    When I put some on roast beef it was so spicy that my ears started ringing.
    I thought I had grown a variety that was too spicy but now I see it was improper handling on my part.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
    Phone 541-592-5071, Email burlsource@gmail.com
    Visit our web store

  9. #19
    Yup. Thanks for something else for me to obsess over!

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