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Edge Trailing vs. Edge Leading Strokes While Sharpening. - Page 2
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Thread: Edge Trailing vs. Edge Leading Strokes While Sharpening.

  1. #11
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cazhpfan View Post
    (or the current best-practices for sharpening technique).
    Whatever is most comfortable or effective for you, the sharpener.

    Just focus on creating clean bevels without wobbling etc. first, then over time you will be able to zero in on the small idiosyncrasies that you may prefer.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  2. #12
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    In my experience (not insignificant but I would never represent myself as an expert in this forum), edge leading strokes are good for deburring and edge trailing strokes are good for aligning the thinnest part of the edge.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Whatever is most comfortable or effective for you, the sharpener.

    Just focus on creating clean bevels without wobbling etc. first, then over time you will be able to zero in on the small idiosyncrasies that you may prefer.
    Got it. Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by ChefCosta View Post
    In my experience (not insignificant but I would never represent myself as an expert in this forum), edge leading strokes are good for deburring and edge trailing strokes are good for aligning the thinnest part of the edge.
    Once again, thank you for the help. I appreciate the feedback.

    Last question: At which point do we say that a knife is sharp enough? What's a good test of sharpness?

  4. #14
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Double beveled knives I stop at 5k. Single bevel I go to 12k. Test on arm hair and check to see if the entire length of the blade can shave in each section, tip, belly , flat, heel. Also paper push cut test. Straight downward push with no slicing motion. Again, check each section individually.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  5. #15
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    I use a ripe tomato. If the edge bites under gentle pressure all the way from heel to tip you're good. I used to do the arm hair thing but my right arm has been basically shaved bald from testing. There is rarely available hair.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cazhpfan View Post
    ...At which point do we say that a knife is sharp enough? What's a good test of sharpness?
    Sharp enough is an individual decision depending on what you are going to cut, how you like the knife to feel and how often you are willing to refresh the edge. Sure, you can take a gyuto to 10K or beyond, but that level of edge refinement isn't going to last long against a board. Most of us take a gyuto to 5 or 6K; some stop at 1 or 2K for more "bite". Do a little experimentation and see what works best for you.

    Shaving arm hair, push cutting paper, slicing tomatoes - all will tell you something about the edge. I use a test that I picked up from reading some of K C Ma's posts. Take a paper towel, fold it in half lengthwise, then fold it again, then roll it up tightly to make a cylinder maybe 2 inches long and a half inch or so thick. Slicing into this cylinder will tell you a lot about your edge, and more importantly, will let you detect areas of the edge that aren't as sharp as you want.
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”

  7. #17
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    Hi All!

    Thank you for the great advice.
    I appreciate the help and will be trying all the suggestions as I continue practicing.

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