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Hand Held Reciprocating Saw for Butchery?
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Thread: Hand Held Reciprocating Saw for Butchery?

  1. #1
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    Hand Held Reciprocating Saw for Butchery?

    Greetings,
    Looking to develop some custom meat fabrications that I can play around with before requesting them from our lamb purveyor. I need to be able to cut lamb bones but do not want to invest 3K or the floor space for a band saw. Looking to do things like splitting the spine, squaring off the ball joint to facilitate removal of marrow, etc. I realize that this may qualify me as a psychopath but has anyone tried this with a hand held reciprocating saw? Obviously safety precautions like clamping the meat in place, eyeware, etc would be followed. Basically looking for a cheap, effective implement...any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Ucmd's Avatar
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    Why not just a hand saw? Much cheaper and safer.

  3. #3
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    We tried with the hand saw and couldn't get the cuts as clean and as straight as we wanted.

  4. #4
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    Dont see why not but it will be hard to keep sanitary and you would need some long blades which can be a bit flexi.Great idea -i will be interested to see how it works.

  5. #5

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Was the hand saw you tried a bone saw? A true bone saw would make a big difference.
    I think a reciprocating saw would be really wonky and really unsanitary.
    You could just get a super cheapo bandsaw and throw it away....................



    ..............good luck disposing of the corpses.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
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    I've used one. It was one hand operated. I abandoned the method quickly. This is a craftsman C3 line. Way better for this than the two hand operated ones.

    What is more overkill the power saw or double fisting coffee and an energy drink?
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  7. #7
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    Milwaukee make a pretty inexpensive band saw that we use a lot doing electrical work. I was able to use it one handed but I would think it would be easy to put in a clamp if you needed both hands free. http://www.milwaukeetool.com/power-tools/corded/6242-6

  8. #8
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    I use a sawzall for doing deer in the garage, dont know how I feel about it in a professional kitchen tho..

  9. #9
    I have used a Sawzall before, I did not find it terribly effective and switched to a hand/hack saw.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  10. #10
    I've used a sawzall to split deer too and it works great. Only thing is you either need to find raw blades, or find a way of taking the paint off of regular blades. I like to split them and keep the chine on the loin - makes a great French rack. We also cook the ribs in foil on coals - we have delicious venison around here.

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