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Thread: So I got the Anova - what next?

  1. #1
    daveb's Avatar
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    So I got the Anova - what next?

    I had a little extra in the toy budget and picked up an Anova. Wondering what else I need to get the most out of it.

    I have a few different sized Cambros, at least one of which I'll do a cut out in the lid. Think I'm good there.

    I've a good strip sealer that I've used for Sous Vide but am ready to make the jump to a chamber sealer. I've spent some time reading older threads here. Is the VacMaster 112 at 600 and change (Amazon) still the most bang for the buck?

    Also looking for a cookbook, some time/temp charts, etc. Saw the MC at Home but I've never spent a hundred bucks on a cookbook before. Most interested in lamb/beef, vegs, some confit. No interest (at this time) in foams, powders and the like.

    I've already done some soft poached eggs per the instruction manual and have short ribs in the fridge. Any guidance on above or on anything I've missed will be appreciated.
    Dave
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Ucmd's Avatar
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    Look at vac master 210. Lot more sealer for not much more. Same guts as 112.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Dave, I've had the VP112 for two years now and its killer, sure I've had to replace a few lids due to hairline cracks but vacmaster sent them me at no cost or hassel. The VP112 is larger than the 210 and more conveinent for the home. When i first started doing SV I got caught up with times and temps. First, SV is most impactful with proteins over veg. To the end:

    Chicken and Pork always at 140 degrees. Light meat = less time in sv but same temp

    Beef always at 129 degrees, again tender cuts less time, tougher longer time.

    thats really all there is but let me know if you have any other questions.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

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    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveb View Post
    I had a little extra in the toy budget and picked up an Anova. Wondering what else I need to get the most out of it.

    I have a few different sized Cambros, at least one of which I'll do a cut out in the lid. Think I'm good there.

    I've a good strip sealer that I've used for Sous Vide but am ready to make the jump to a chamber sealer. I've spent some time reading older threads here. Is the VacMaster 112 at 600 and change (Amazon) still the most bang for the buck?

    Also looking for a cookbook, some time/temp charts, etc. Saw the MC at Home but I've never spent a hundred bucks on a cookbook before. Most interested in lamb/beef, vegs, some confit. No interest (at this time) in foams, powders and the like.

    I've already done some soft poached eggs per the instruction manual and have short ribs in the fridge. Any guidance on above or on anything I've missed will be appreciated.

    If you haven't yet, get "Under Pressure" from Thomas Keller. It's a good jumping off point.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  5. #5
    Daveb, if you don't mind me asking, what sealer do you currently use? Do you like it? I was thinking about getting one of the smaller vacmaster sealers but I detested my foodsaver and am looking for alternatives.

  6. #6
    daveb's Avatar
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    Thanks all for the input so far. There is room for more...

    @Theory - "Under Pressure" is on the way. Thanks for the rec.

    @ Erilyn - I replaced a failed FS with a Cabela's sealer that has worked very well. I think Weston makes it. I'm going with a chamber unit so that I can get wet with marinades and confit.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  7. #7

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Dave, I've had the VP112 for two years now and its killer, sure I've had to replace a few lids due to hairline cracks but vacmaster sent them me at no cost or hassel. The VP112 is larger than the 210 and more conveinent for the home. When i first started doing SV I got caught up with times and temps. First, SV is most impactful with proteins over veg. To the end:

    Chicken and Pork always at 140 degrees. Light meat = less time in sv but same temp

    Beef always at 129 degrees, again tender cuts less time, tougher longer time.

    thats really all there is but let me know if you have any other questions.

    MB, why so high on the temps for chicken/ pork? Ive been doing pork ribs at 130 and been pleased. The time/temp charts say it's pasteurized in 2-3 hours @ 130.

    What gives?
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    MB, why so high on the temps for chicken/ pork? Ive been doing pork ribs at 130 and been pleased. The time/temp charts say it's pasteurized in 2-3 hours @ 130.

    What gives?
    Probably for texture. You get different textures at different temps. I find chicken at lower temps still looks a bit pink/raw although I know it's safe to eat. I go higher so people in the house wouldn't be scared to eat it lol.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Agreed Talim. Z you could get away with 130 for white breast even pork loin. For the darker muscles I like higher temp with less time. The analogy is to think of muscle proteins as springs. The greater the heat the more the spring coils. The greater the coil the more juices are squeezed out of the muscle. The hydrogen bonds in the protein are (denatured) and the spring uncoils and the meat gets soft again.

    Sous Vide cooks by denaturing the protein (break the hydrogen bonds) without squeezing (coiling the spring) out the liquid. Temp vary with muscle type ( fast twitch vs slow twitch, white meat vs dark meat) and across different animals. White fish denatures at 107 while blue fish will take ~135.

    For St Louis ribs I like a hot 1hour sous vide treatment at 225 after an hour of humidified smoke. Some call this the Texas Crutch. Will denature a lot of hydrogen bonds without breaking too many. Ribs are a lot trickier than people realize. Sure they're good cook briefly (grilled) or many hours in the smoker. Personally I like my ribs when the meat still holds the bone when separated. Falling off the bone is preferred for BBQ chicken though.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  10. #10

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Got it! Thanks for the detailed response...as always

    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Agreed Talim. Z you could get away with 130 for white breast even pork loin. For the darker muscles I like higher temp with less time. The analogy is to think of muscle proteins as springs. The greater the heat the more the spring coils. The greater the coil the more juices are squeezed out of the muscle. The hydrogen bonds in the protein are (denatured) and the spring uncoils and the meat gets soft again.

    Sous Vide cooks by denaturing the protein (break the hydrogen bonds) without squeezing (coiling the spring) out the liquid. Temp vary with muscle type ( fast twitch vs slow twitch, white meat vs dark meat) and across different animals. White fish denatures at 107 while blue fish will take ~135.

    For St Louis ribs I like a hot 1hour sous vide treatment at 225 after an hour of humidified smoke. Some call this the Texas Crutch. Will denature a lot of hydrogen bonds without breaking too many. Ribs are a lot trickier than people realize. Sure they're good cook briefly (grilled) or many hours in the smoker. Personally I like my ribs when the meat still holds the bone when separated. Falling off the bone is preferred for BBQ chicken though.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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