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Thread: Buffer safety tips?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Buffer safety tips?

    Out of all the tools I use to play with knives I'm finding that my little 6" Harbor freight buffer is the most dangerous of them all. This little buffer has the tendency to grab blades and fling them around with my hands still holding on to the blade. I was wondering if the more experienced members can enlighten us on how to use this death machine more safely?

  2. #2
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    I believe Will Catcheside once recommended full body armour as the only safe option.

  3. #3
    Senior Member chefcomesback's Avatar
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    I know it is super slow but for the sake of safety I use dremels buffer attachment once the blade is secured from the tang onto a vice

  4. #4

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    My solution for a safer buffer was to wire a 1750 DC motor to a DC speed controller. 1750 is my max speed and I often go slower, most buffers are 3400spm.

  5. #5
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    Are there any machines that have a slip clutch? Similar to that on a drill for instance, the wheel would slip rather than catching the thing you are buffing and throwing it about, no idea about buffing just curious.

  6. #6
    I use an old die grinder hooked up to a speed controller for buffs up to 14", or a 1/2" drill hooked up to the controller for 8" buffs. It works great.

  7. #7
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
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    If you must use one, low power motor (1/3hp) at 1725 rpm or less. A large diameter wheel will help as well.
    Don't ever polish a sharpened blade, if you have to do that, dull the blade and resharpen later. If you are polishing handles, cover the blade with cardboard and wrap with masking tape. It may take a minute or two, but it's better than a blade in your leg. Don't hold the blade so the wheel can grab it, this may be hard to explain. If you are holding the blade edge down, only polish the lower half, then flip the blade so you can polish the top half.
    I hope this will help.
    Thanks,
    Del

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the responses guys, keep them coming. Never thought of using a larger diameter wheel to lower the speed.

  9. #9

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    May 2013
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    Battle Ground, WA
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    An old timer (Dan Westlind) showed me how to grind lengthwise on the blade. That way, there is nothing for the wheel to grab. The other alternative is to hold the handle in a vise with the blade horizontal and use a hand buffer to buff the flat side lengthwise.

    Tim

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