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Thread: Informal Chef Clothing

  1. #1
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Informal Chef Clothing

    Perhaps this is a silly question, but I must ask it. Basically where I work they aren't super strict about what clothes you wear and generally I wear an expensive Chef jacket and decent clothes, apron etc. However, the weather is starting to heat up a bit and I find the jacket pretty unbearable and I often resort to taking it off and just wearing a plain white T shirt. However, sometimes customers will see me and I think it doesn't look great and I am looking for ideas. So do any of you guys wear any informal clothing that is still presentable and doesn't look out of place in the kitchen? I am considering either buying an expensive white T shirt or perhaps just a formal white shirt, something comfortable that still looks ok. Any ideas/photos are welcome
    "There are 2 mistakes one can make along the road to truth...not going all the way and not starting"

  2. #2
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    Hey dude,
    I sometimes wear bakers' shirts like this one -http://www.russums-shop.co.uk/clothing-c4/coats-and-workwear-c14/unisex-bakers-tunic-white-polycotton-short-sleeves-p232

    I also wore white t shirts at a 2 Michelin starred restaurant as dress code, but spent a fortune as they seem harder to keep white and are prone to shrinkage...

  3. #3
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    I wear I nice short sleeve white jacket with black lapel/trim(basically a nice dishwashers coat). It's cool and looks professional at the same time.

  4. #4
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Steven, down here in louisiana its very hot and muggy much of the year. Ive never worked at a place that had decent ac conditioning either. My favorite work attire that minimizes the suffering is button up white collar shirts like this http://www.chefworks.com/?page=shop/...jc7lkq8c4svdq3
    The ones ventilated back chef shirts/coats dont seem to be noticeably cooler to me so i dont bother with them.
    Im not too into chefwear pants, i think they look rather silly on me. But theyre still pretty lightweight and breathable compared to any other pants ive ever worn at work. Im just to vein to order more.
    For underwear in the summertime i wear under armor boxer briefs or cheap knock offs that wick away moisture and decrease chafing on longer shifts.

  5. #5
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    Steven, down here in louisiana its very hot and muggy much of the year. Ive never worked at a place that had decent ac conditioning either. My favorite work attire that minimizes the suffering is button up white collar shirts like this http://www.chefworks.com/?page=shop/...jc7lkq8c4svdq3
    The ones ventilated back chef shirts/coats dont seem to be noticeably cooler to me so i dont bother with them.
    Im not too into chefwear pants, i think they look rather silly on me. But theyre still pretty lightweight and breathable compared to any other pants ive ever worn at work. Im just to vein to order more.
    For underwear in the summertime i wear under armor boxer briefs or cheap knock offs that wick away moisture and decrease chafing on longer shifts.
    I prefer getting the cheaper cook shirts because at $10-15 per shirt theyre pretty inexpensive to replace once they get trashed after a 5-6 month period.

  6. #6
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    Yea the bakers shirts don't look too bad I just wear a short sleeve jacket year round though.

  7. #7
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    If anyone is curious I bought one of these Le Chef Prep Shirts today, I thought it would be perfect but it's a terrible fit, way too loose but yet really tight at the neck so I must try something different
    "There are 2 mistakes one can make along the road to truth...not going all the way and not starting"

  8. #8
    Senior Member ShaggySean's Avatar
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    I wear chef jackets most of the time but I work in the hottest kitchen ever and I wear T shirts alot most of the time I just wear one from a brewery we serve but I do wear a f@#K salad sorry on occasion

  9. #9
    Senior Member Dardeau's Avatar
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    The last two jobs I've had have cotton or poly cooks shirts. I'm so used to them at this point I don't know if I could go back to coats for anything other than photos or offsites.

  10. #10
    To quote the Au Pied de Cochon cookbook:

    "... The cooks do not wear uniforms. Cooks' uniforms are outdated, and haven't changed at all in two centuries. The simple act of putting on a uniform seems to be all it takes to convince folks that the cook knows what he's doing. This is pretty typical of our times; we're more concerned with the image of the cook than we are with the cook himself. I want my T-shirted crew to be considered among the elite not for the image they project, but for the quality of their cooking. I prepare food to make people happy. And a uniform just makes me sad. If snazzy outfits are what you want, it might be an idea to try the local Dunkin' Donuts. - MP"

    I agree 100% with that. A clean t-shirt (not undershirt), chef pants or jeans, and a hat - all you need IMO. I hate having to wear jackets.

    Edit: Just to be clear, I didn't mean that as an insult or commentary towards you Steven. Just in response to some of the people I've come across who spend tons of money on their double-breasted, seersucker jackets w/ names & titles - like it actually means something.

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