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Deburring issue
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Thread: Deburring issue

  1. #1

    Deburring issue

    Hi everyone, I am another new guy with a question about a Watanabe 150mm petty I've had for a couple months.
    I cannot get this thing to hold an edge to save my life. I took a picture with lots of glare to try to show what's happening, but I can't figure out how to include it here. Maybe my "posting images" skills are related to my deburring skills I can get the knife pretty sharp, but the edge just buckles even after one light use

    About me and my skills: I am a professional carpenter/woodworker with lots of experience sharpening blue/white steel Jp tools. I have a pretty decent selection of stones and feel like I know them pretty well. Knives aren't totally new to me, but I've probably only been sharpening for 2-3 years. I get good results that last on my other knives (a Yoshikane 180 Gyuto and two kind of generic wa-handled knives from Japan Woodworker http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product/ ... agata.aspx) so I'm a little curious about the fact that I'm having such issues with just this one. It seriously looks like I've used it to chop sand on a granite counter, which I have not.

    Also... although I'm pretty sure this is a burr/wire edge issue, I also can't say I've been totally impressed by this knife overall. The fit and finish was kind of rough, the grind was pretty bad (see pic--it took me like 2 hours to flatten out the high/low spots enough to sharpen) and I had to pay extra to upgrade from a plastic ferrule, which brought the price up to around $200. I feel like maybe I could have done better.

    OK, I'll try to wrap it up. I have tried EVERYTHING to deburr this blade after sharpening: edge trailing strokes on each stone, stropping, gentle slicing through cork, soft wood, felt block, you name it. Any suggestions?

    Also, if anyone has any suggestions for a nice laser-ish petty, I'm looking. I keep looking at the Kamo R2 http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/kar2pe15.html. It just looks bad. But I'd love to hear from someone who's actually used one and has some feedback.

    Any help you guys can offer is greatly appreciated.

    Patrick

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    watanabe's blue steel lasts what seems like an eternity. see if somebody else locally can try sharpening it.
    but it sounds like you already decided you want a thin petty instead of a robust one so it's really a moot point. sell/trade it and move on.

  3. #3
    It seems like you have a good idea about what you're doing.

    The most helpful thing for tenacious burrs that I've found is doing "horizontal" strokes on my final stone. I'll flip the burr a few times (stropping) in an attempt to weaken it and then pull the knife, burr side down, across the middle of the stone at the same angle I strop at. Usually I'll do this two or three times, just stropping once per side a few times before deburring, and then pull through cork. I find it helps a lot and is more aggressive in burr reduction then just felt or cork.

    You might also consider sharpening at a higher angle and doing a microbevel to help deburr and give your edge more stability. Jon's video on this is helpful if you haven't seen it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwnFrjiAA_8

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JDA_NC View Post
    It seems like you have a good idea about what you're doing.

    The most helpful thing for tenacious burrs that I've found is doing "horizontal" strokes on my final stone. I'll flip the burr a few times (stropping) in an attempt to weaken it and then pull the knife, burr side down, across the middle of the stone at the same angle I strop at. Usually I'll do this two or three times, just stropping once per side a few times before deburring, and then pull through cork. I find it helps a lot and is more aggressive in burr reduction then just felt or cork.

    You might also consider sharpening at a higher angle and doing a microbevel to help deburr and give your edge more stability. Jon's video on this is helpful if you haven't seen it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwnFrjiAA_8
    Nice. I tried your method and got dialed in with the magnifier a bit more, and I'm definitely seeing improvement. I just chopped a bunch of onions and carrots, and made sure to get some good, audible board contact (which I never do) just to make sure. So far so good.
    Also, I checked out Jon's video... definitely educational. I think I'll take a look at some of his others.
    Thanks for your help.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Lots of stropping on leather with a fine buffing compound has sorted out every form of burr I've ever encountered. I usually make some light strokes on my finishing stone and then strop on plain leather afterward, to avoid a slippery edge from the compound.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    modesto area
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    Yes that has been working for me as well. I have made 5 different strops with different compounds. My finest grit stone is a 6000 king.
    Quote Originally Posted by Squilliam View Post
    Lots of stropping on leather with a fine buffing compound has sorted out every form of burr I've ever encountered. I usually make some light strokes on my finishing stone and then strop on plain leather afterward, to avoid a slippery edge from the compound.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by loves2cook View Post
    Yes that has been working for me as well. I have made 5 different strops with different compounds. My finest grit stone is a 6000 king.
    Nice, that's one thing I really haven't tried. I've used Green Rouge on wood, but not leather. Any specific kind of strop or compound that's working best? I've seen bovine, kangaroo... horse butt... And I think I've read some stuff here about Ken's CBN spray?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    I just bought some scrap pieces of leather and I've used metal polish, green and white buffing compound and next I'm going to get some jewelers polish/compound and give it a try. I also picked up a leather strop made from horse which is suppose to be better quality. I have yet to try the sprays. So far I'm very happy with the results as I've practiced allot on my old knives. When my Tojiro Shirogami Nakiri 165mm White #2 arrives I'm going to put my newly learned skills to the test.

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