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Thread: Suehiro Rika vs Arashiyama 6000

  1. #21
    daveb's Avatar
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    FL? Which coast? For the price of a stamp you can try a Rika. No joy on Arashiyama but Rika is good all-rounder that pairs well with the Bestor 1.2K
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  2. #22
    Dough, would you mind elaborating on how the edges from the two stones differ?

    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by dough View Post
    Arashiyama is a great stone but covers a broader range of polish... it somewhat covers the 6-8k range particularly if you know how to work the slurry. the rika is a dynamic quick 5k that does not dish overly quick and is good with most steels.

    you should get the arashiyama mounted if you buy one because they have a tendency to crack after enough drying cycles. the other fact is the arashiyama is the same stone as the takenoko which leads to grit can be subjective and your attitude that you think you dont need an 8K for a knife is more to do with your style both sharpening and cutting then a comment on actual grit.

    i like both stones and think they both have a place but the arashiyama covers a broader range and imo is a more enjoyable feeling stone to use however the rika is a more useful stone in a progression. i must admit if i could only have one or had to stop at one or the other id choose the arashiyama bc i like cutting with that edge better then an edge finished on a rika.

    also with all that said you arent me and dont seem like me so i say buy the rika and dont look back. imo its a more useful stone particularly for a beginner on a budget.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by daveb View Post
    FL? Which coast? For the price of a stamp you can try a Rika. No joy on Arashiyama but Rika is good all-rounder that pairs well with the Bestor 1.2K
    I see you're near Tampa. I'm in Palm Beach County, but my wife's parents live in Tampa, so we visit a couple times a year.

  4. #24
    When I started freehand sharpening a couple years ago, I saw a good number of recommendations for both of these stones--they both seem to be pretty well regarded. I ended up going with the Arashiyama, and I'm happy with it. No Suehiro Rika experience to compare.

    For a relative beginner, I'm guessing that either of these stones would work pretty well to refine the edge--I don't see any clearly wrong choice between the two. I think I'd have to be a significantly better and more experienced sharpener to see that much difference.

  5. #25
    Thank you for the info, Todd! I'm leaning more and more towards the Arashiyama.

    Quote Originally Posted by toddnmd View Post
    When I started freehand sharpening a couple years ago, I saw a good number of recommendations for both of these stones--they both seem to be pretty well regarded. I ended up going with the Arashiyama, and I'm happy with it. No Suehiro Rika experience to compare.

    For a relative beginner, I'm guessing that either of these stones would work pretty well to refine the edge--I don't see any clearly wrong choice between the two. I think I'd have to be a significantly better and more experienced sharpener to see that much difference.

  6. #26
    I have an arashiyama and its fine but I prefer the Rika. My coworker has one at work so when i sharpen at work, I use that. When I sharpen at home, I use the Arashiyama. I just like the feel of the stone better. As for the actual edge, I can't really tell any difference but I don't think about it too much.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrokov View Post
    Anyone in South Florida who might want to let me use their stones so I can feel for myself?
    Quote Originally Posted by daveb View Post
    FL? Which coast?
    Sorry for being off topic, but being a native Floridian and growing up in West Palm Beach, IMHO, "South Florida" can only mean the area comprised of Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach County.
    Fudoushin Bujinkan Dojo: http://fudoushin.com/

  8. #28
    Well, I would've like to give a comparison to the Rika but I don't have one so I couldn't say much about it. But what I can say is, just hold your breath and take the plunge. With regards to stones cracking for no reason, if you do your best to look after them and use your tools in the manner in which they are supposed to be used, I don't see any reasons for unpredictable stone behaviour.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Yamabushi View Post
    Sorry for being off topic, but being a native Floridian and growing up in West Palm Beach, IMHO, "South Florida" can only mean the area comprised of Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach County.
    Indeed. Tampa, Sarasota, even Naples is not "South Florida"

    Since people keep mentioning cracks, I'll refer to Jon's post:
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-nGo-Some-Info
    Resinoid based stones respond to soaking and drying differently from ceramic, clay based, and magnesia based stones. Magnesia based stones, like the chocera, will crack when over-soaked due to magnesia (the binding agent) leaching out in the water. After a while, the stone looses structural stability. Clay based and ceramic stones do not have any cracking problems unless dropped (or sometimes when they are worn thin and you exert too much pressure in an unsupported section). Vitrified stones work in a similar way to the ceramic and clay based stones, but are often less firm and can break more easily when dropped and/or worn too thin. Resinoid based stones, like the gesshin 6000, arashiyama, kitayama, and even some of maxim's stones, respond to soaking differently. The soaking is actually not the issue at all. Soaking helps soften the stone, causing it to release more abrasive more quickly, improving tactile feedback, and helping create more mud. However, repeated soaking and drying, drying too quickly, or changes in humidity based on environment cause the stone to dry out unevenly. Because resinoid based stones are not as porous, air can not penetrate as quickly, nor can water escape in the same way. As water leaves the outer portion of the stone, the loss of mass causes the outside of the stone to shrink faster than the inside of the stone, which is the main cause of cracking with stones like this. Therefore, when it comes to resinoid based stones, you need to pick one of the following ways of dealing with them:
    -soak permanently
    -use as a splash and go stone
    -soak and dry, but dry very carefully and slowly, while paying attention to general humidity
    FYI, the Suehiro Rika is vitrified, and the Arashiyama is resinoid (according to Jon...WTH do I know?)

  10. #30

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