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Thread: Bent the Tip, How to fix?

  1. #11
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Probably looking at around $25-$35 to start depending upon where you send it and the extent of the damage. It is a relatively easy fix you can do yourself on a diamond plate or really coarse stone. A sidewalk would even do. lol
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    That almost never works. Bending it back always seems to weaken the steel. With harder steels it will usually just snap off.
    just want to add another vote in favor of theory's posts. the picture he posted was drastic but its the same process. also in my experience bent tips break off then get reground. im sure there are many dynamics im not fit to explain that could be involved in how a tip responds to trauma that would bend rather then break it in the first place much less not allow it to bend back but i know i have had zero success bending back a tip on any harder steel knife and likewise i have rarely had harder steel bend and not break so most often im left with a slightly bent nub behind. that nub is fixed as theory describes.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Come on! According to the OP's description it's all about 2mm. All you need are 2 square inches of sandpaper. It's done within 2 minutes.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Come on! According to the OP's description it's all about 2mm. All you need are 2 square inches of sandpaper. It's done within 2 minutes.
    Why don't you do a video to show us that it takes 2 minutes?
    Michael
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  5. #15
    Senior Member JHunter's Avatar
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    The old French guy that taught me in school fixed a few bent tips of classmates using the grout between floor tiles to do what Benuser is suggesting in a few moments

  6. #16
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Why don't you do a video to show us that it takes 2 minutes?
    I'm sure that after reading my previous post (nr 3) in this thread you won't need a video to get convinced, Michael. Best regards, Bernard

  7. #17
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shallots View Post
    Thanks for the input guys.

    The tip bend is literally so small you wouldn't notice it unless you were specifically looking for it. It does not require shaving off metal to form a new tip like the picture Theory posted. It still isn't good for work though so it needs to be fixed.

    I'll try gently bending it back somehow and if that doesn't work I'll send it to Korin.
    based on your description,

    a) I wld hold the knife sideways with the curved side at high angle just to remove the "protusion". Effect is like flattening it. Alternatively, adrade the protusion on a small corner of the medium stone. IF it is that small, the tip shld be only slightly rounded after this exercise.

    b) IF being less than pointy troubles you... then you need to abrade from the spine to the tip by using draw strokes towards you till it is pointy again.

    I prefer to use sandpaper say 400 to 600 grit for this purpose so as not create deep striations on my stones. There are times that I use the sides of the stone to achieve this objective.



    I doubt very much that you can damage your knife by changing the edge profile as you are leaving the edge profile alone. So have a go at it. there's nothing to lose.

    rgds
    d

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    I'm sure that after reading my previous post (nr 3) in this thread you won't need a video to get convinced, Michael. Best regards, Bernard
    I do need to be convinced, Bernard. Because I've used an Atoma 140 to fix a tip that I lost about 4 mm of soft stainless steel and it took me more than 2 minutes. It took more like 30 to properly reshape it by grinding down the spine toward the edge and reshaping the edge.

    Come to think of it, I've seen other people use mechanical grinders to fix 2 mm chips or broken tips and it takes them well over 2 minutes to reshape tips or edges properly, of carbon and stainless knives. This is using coarse mechanical grinders.

    So, yes, I do need to be convinced. Because based on what I've done and what I've seen multiple times, you're either (1) grossly exaggerating, (2) lying, (3) doing a complete hack job, (4) doing the bare minimum, or (5) your work looks like it was dragged through the street and needs hours to be refinished.

    Two minutes? Prove it. Because every single person, including professional sharpeners, and others who do their own regrinding and refinishing I've spoken with thinks that to do this repair in two minutes is laughable.
    Michael
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  9. #19
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    No, Michael, I'm not going to enter into your little game, even if you insist. Your customary insults and provocations won't change my mind. Again, read or reread my post, nr 3. It's indeed the strictest minimum that has to be done. No thinning required, no distal taper to be restored, just lowering the spine until it reaches the edge. Soft stainless is quite abrasion resistant, normal carbon steel is not. You may believe me or not, call me liar, it's all your problem, not mine.

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