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A Tall Gyuto With A Belly - An Universal Appeal?
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Thread: A Tall Gyuto With A Belly - An Universal Appeal?

  1. #1

    A Tall Gyuto With A Belly - An Universal Appeal?

    A friend of mine who has been talking to chefs in his area (who are not part of KKF community) noted that many if not most, expressed preference for tall gyutos with a lot of belly.

    This made me wonder if the preferences of the majority of KKF community (less belly, not overly tall blades, primarily push-pull cutters) are not representative of the wider population who still prefers to rock-cut. I understand that European chefs knives with thicker convex grinds won't lend well to push/pull cut, at the same time as thinly grind Japanese style knives are much efficient performing push/pull cut so no rocking is necessary, I guess, I am mostly interested here in preferences.

    So, what's your take on it based on interacting with people (pros and home chefs) outside of KKF?

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  2. #2
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    Really I am a pro and I think too much belly is weird it looks awkward and feel awkward I just don't get it?

  3. #3
    I saw one of those knives. It had about 80mm height and a very steep curve toward the tip. I don't think I would ever make anything like it, but the guy loved that knife and profile. Granted, not every one would like that knife, but I can see the pattern - taller knives with more curve, sort of like Shigefusa on steroids.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  4. #4
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    have you seen a Wusthof's profile recently...I just don't get thing looks really stupid IMHO

  5. #5
    Senior Member Anton's Avatar
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    Out of 3 pros: Two I know really liked their high heel big bellies until I had them use a DT ITK and once they got used to it and somewhat changed their cutting style they were shocked as to how much better a flatter profile with sweet spots was. Then again, another one was so set on his rocking that a big belly was the only way for him. Our conclusion was that a big number of commercially available knives have big bellies and this is what they start with and get used to and simply don't know better. This is the case only for 3 line cooks and doesn't reflect any further feedback outside of these.

  6. #6
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    I might ask around but it seems that I've never met a knife-savvy cook. I've heard a few chefs go on about how a chef is only as good as his knife, but none of them knew anything about knives. I don't hear much knife talk among the Chinese cooks I know.

  7. #7
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    This is true XooMG, I have never met another chef as obsessed with knives as myself. They think the best is Shun or Global and Wusthof

  8. #8
    I'm not a pro but I caught bits and pieces of a Chopped episode the other day where one of the cheftestants commented that he judges other chefs by their knives. The less mainstream the more serious and skilled chef he thinks they are. He was using a bull nose to cut up his meat. He won too.

    It does surprise me on shows like chopped, ICA and TC to see many of these chefs use mostly mainstream knives. The only time I see more of a variety is TC Masters or if one of the cheftestants are extremely skilled.

  9. #9
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    Some cooking shows are alright

  10. #10
    +1 Anton.

    Back in the 1980's Prego chunky red sauce took off when people tested it side by side with regular marinara. Until then sauce makers just asked what they preferred and people gave the answer of what they were used to. They didn't like the idea of tomato chunks in a sauce.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

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