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Thread: Where r the computer geeks at?

  1. #11
    Knowing what NSA has been doing, do you really trust those clouds to keep your infos private?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    That works until the internet doesn't.
    Not really. Solutions that I mentioned would just add encryption to the process of syncing your stuff between local machine and cloud. So you'd retain all the data encrypted locally all the time.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by icanhaschzbrgr View Post
    Not really. Solutions that I mentioned would just add encryption to the process of syncing your stuff between local machine and cloud. So you'd retain all the data encrypted locally all the time.
    You're missing the point. The objective is to keep all, and I mean ALL, of your sensitive data on the flash drive. No local copies that require synchronization, no copies in the cloud, just the flash drive, which you keep on your person. If you are sufficiently paranoid, you make another drive and entrust it to another person or hide it real well.
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    You're missing the point. The objective is to keep all, and I mean ALL, of your sensitive data on the flash drive. No local copies that require synchronization, no copies in the cloud, just the flash drive, which you keep on your person. If you are sufficiently paranoid, you make another drive and entrust it to another person or hide it real well.
    Yeah, I guess I'm really missing the point. If the data is so important then having only one or two copies is nothing but crazy
    If I were a real paranoid I'd try to infiltrate the world with as many copies as possible. Upload them everywhere.

    As for encryption itself my point is pretty simple: if you can decrypt it, then anyone else can decrypt it. The tricky part is, you can decrypt it almost instantly assuming you have you secret key, while all others would have to brute force key (or try to some other ways to weaken encryption) which could take very significant amounts of time.

    I've seen too many dead flashdrives to trust them. Heck, I don't even trust the flash that's in my camera, cause I know it WILL fail one day. It already happened with my old camera once, so could happen again.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    You're missing the point. The objective is to keep all, and I mean ALL, of your sensitive data on the flash drive. No local copies that require synchronization, no copies in the cloud, just the flash drive, which you keep on your person. If you are sufficiently paranoid, you make another drive and entrust it to another person or hide it real well.
    I suggest a simple balloon. Condoms are too thin and finger cots aren't flexible enough. Also avoid the flash drives with sharp edges even if they're smaller. And a little Vaseline goes a long way.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by icanhaschzbrgr View Post
    Yeah, I guess I'm really missing the point. If the data is so important then having only one or two copies is nothing but crazy
    If I were a real paranoid I'd try to infiltrate the world with as many copies as possible. Upload them everywhere.

    As for encryption itself my point is pretty simple: if you can decrypt it, then anyone else can decrypt it. The tricky part is, you can decrypt it almost instantly assuming you have you secret key, while all others would have to brute force key (or try to some other ways to weaken encryption) which could take very significant amounts of time.

    I've seen too many dead flashdrives to trust them. Heck, I don't even trust the flash that's in my camera, cause I know it WILL fail one day. It already happened with my old camera once, so could happen again.
    You're confusing backups with security.
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  7. #17
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    I suggest a simple balloon. Condoms are too thin and finger cots aren't flexible enough. Also avoid the flash drives with sharp edges even if they're smaller. And a little Vaseline goes a long way.

    He said ON your person, not IN your person.
    Sheesh Salty!
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  8. #18
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    If you're serious about security................

  9. #19
    Im a computer forensics guy. So download truecrypt and install it on any drive you want encrypted (it's easy to use and there's lots of documentation for it). Also use a password/key that's long. How I do passwords is that I pick a long sentence I can easily remember and change letters to signs. Like @ for all As. Every so often I'll change the signs instead of @ for As, I'll use 3 for Es.


    Why i stress long passwords:

    You have to think that choosing one lowercase letter is 26 combinations. So a 3 letter password with repetition is 26x26x26 = 26^3 combinations. If you have upper and lower case then it's 52 combinations. 52^3 for a 3 letter password that's only uppercase and lower case. The number gets astronomical when you add symbols/punctuation and have a long password. The general formula is (How many total different symbols) ^ (length of password) = (number of combinations).

    The goal is to make it long enough so someone will have to spend too much time to break it. I know guys still running a password brute force program to break a criminals hard drive for over 2yrs.

    I have a lot of data so I use a two 2.5" external drives for backup. I find those laptop hard drives as more reliable than flash drives for backup.

    And people posting about AES encryption being cracked. It's not true. AES is the standard. People know how these formulas work, but no one has found a fast way to break them. It will still take millions of years to crack an AES key. Don't worry about 128k vs 192k vs 256k. No real difference yet. But people "feel" safer with the higher number.

  10. #20
    I forgot. I don't hold sensitive data on cloud storage like Dropbox or other companies because you never know what happens to that data if the company goes under. The general rule I've learned is that once something is online, it's there forever.

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