Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25

Thread: The Rise of Egotarian Cuisine

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    311
    I generally found the article agreeable. When i first started cooking, I was really wowed by beautiful and complicated food. I still have a ton of respect for that side of the craft, and the people who push the boundaries. That said, I've learned it's not how i like to eat, and often times it's not what a neighborhood wants or needs. My passion for cooking came from the simple food served in my household. I like to make people happy with delicious food and I am not too concerned with impressing anyone.
    Young people now are apt to create 'scenes' hipsterish worlds of exclusivity and too-coolness that tend to suck the life out of the craft they claim to uphold. Whether it's food that's uninspired, music you can't dance to, art that is meaningless and unmoving. What con you do? Hopefully a bigger percentage of young chefs in the next few generations will just want to make delicious and sometimes not the prettiest or fussiest food.
    Also, it's just a labor issue too. In my restaurant, we can't afford to have 5 guys anymore to make plates for a 40 seat restaurant, so we had to ditch the 12 component dishes and what not.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,066
    Right now I am working hard on austerity and restraint in my dishes. It's more about what I can leave off and still get the point accross. When the article says chef's tell their story through food I couldn't help picturing my 'food story'. It is me sitting on my couch at 2:00am surrounded by cookbooks and empty beers just pounding my head on the coffee table.
    'I don't want to achieve immortality through my work... I want to achieve it through not dying.' Woody Allen

  3. #13
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Caledonia
    Posts
    1,921
    I think he nailed it.

    There was a time I wanted to be the greatest Chef in the country. Then I grew up.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,066
    It is a good point concerning the maturation process.

    Before I started cooking a sang opera. I was young and lucky to have some great opportunities to perform with people much more experienced and polished than I was. While my directors, conductors and castmates may have recognized that I was performing at a high level for my age, I am pretty sure the majority of the audience members just thought I was being blown out of the water by the other singers on the stage. Had I stuck with it I would just now be able to keep up with the more mature performers.

    Likewise in cooking. Twenty something chefs can take risks and push boundaries. Often then, after realizing how hard it is to run a restaurant they take a step back grow up a bit and begin making the food they will be remembered for. For example I have four line cooks right now that were running kitchens before coming on board with me.

    I am all for younger people finding there voice. Hell, that's what I am doing. It is just hard to overlook that chefs have 50 plus person payrolls attached to all of their stepping stones.
    'I don't want to achieve immortality through my work... I want to achieve it through not dying.' Woody Allen

  5. #15
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Caledonia
    Posts
    1,921
    It kind of relates to a conversation I had last night. An associate of mine was looking for a way to describe our restaurant and business. I gave her the same answer I always give when quizzed about this business in general, "to meet and ideally exceed the customers expectations".

    It's no secret.

  6. #16
    Senior Member marc4pt0's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,561
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuckles View Post
    Right now I am working hard on austerity and restraint in my dishes. It's more about what I can leave off and still get the point accross. When the article says chef's tell their story through food I couldn't help picturing my 'food story'. It is me sitting on my couch at 2:00am surrounded by cookbooks and empty beers just pounding my head on the coffee table.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    It kind of relates to a conversation I had last night. An associate of mine was looking for a way to describe our restaurant and business. I gave her the same answer I always give when quizzed about this business in general, "to meet and ideally exceed the customers expectations".

    It's no secret.
    Two really big thumbs up in agreement here

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,170
    When I sober up, I am going to read this article.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,084
    Simplicity, a lot of people over think everything

  9. #19
    I feel that there's been too many new restaurants with gimmicks and buzz words; truffle this, pork belly that, organic, siracha. I've been to restaurants that cost hundreds a person, but at the end of the day, the food I remember best is one that's a hole in the wall who just makes simple, good food. They're the one who's been around since my parents time and mine and hopefully my children's.

    I bbq a lot and always laugh at the BBQ spice rubs that advertised something like 20 different spices. It's like putting a sauce on a steak, but the best steaks just need some salt and pepper.

    There are defiantly a new breed of chefs who've watched too food network and like to overcomplicate dishes for their egos and as a gimmick, but at the end of the day, most people wouldn't actually know the difference.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,066
    "The better one understands and is able to define an intricate framework of limitations the greater is the freedom lent one's creative imagination." Richard Olney

    "In cooking, as in all the arts, simplicity is the sign of perfection." Curnonsky
    'I don't want to achieve immortality through my work... I want to achieve it through not dying.' Woody Allen

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •