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Restoring Knives?
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Thread: Restoring Knives?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Scrap's Avatar
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    Restoring Knives?

    I've yet to see much on the subject of how one might differently handle sharpening a knife that no longer even has a beveled edge (the condition I find most knives in), and I'm curious as to how all of you handle entirely replacing a knife's edge. Any tips on setting up a knife to work better for someone who you know won't sharpen it would be appreciated too - I've had to do this to nearly 30 knives myself so far, so I'm thinking I need to learn more about what I'm doing.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Plenty of talk on this subject. Just start with a low grit stone or a diamond plate. Maybe a belt grinder if available. For people who won't sharpen, maybe leave it with a toothier edge or teach them how to properly use a ceramic rod at least.
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    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
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    +1 with ThEory. On inexpensive knives, I do much of the work on belts sanders before putting a final edge on with stones. It's fast. If you're just doing a couple knives, I'd start with a coarse stone or diamond plate and finish with a 1 or 2 k stone on most knives.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Geo87's Avatar
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    Yup another +1...when friends ask me to sharpen their cheaper knives with non existent edges I set the new bevels on a diamond plate to save my stones then use regular progression but leaving a toothy edge

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    If a knife is that worn down, wouldn't it need fair thinning too?

  6. #6
    If were are talking abt cheap stamped blades, most of them are already somewhat thin and the edge retention is already poor. I personally see it's being a waste of time to thin. But by all means it can be done if desired.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Scrap's Avatar
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    These ARE mostly stamped/low end knives, plus a few of the overpriced brand you'd find at any Williams Sonoma. Thinning isn't really an issue and quite frankly isn't something I care to take the time for on these knives. I feel I should clarify for now that my current go-to is a pair of fairly low grit diamond stones, as I see no point in letting anything that got in that shape to begin with near my water stones. On a related note, would restoring a blunted tip be roughly the same as sharpening one in good shape? One of my own knives really needs this, but it being a 100+ year old knife I've been reluctant to just have at it until I grind in a new tip.

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