Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Restoring Knives?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Scrap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    60

    Restoring Knives?

    I've yet to see much on the subject of how one might differently handle sharpening a knife that no longer even has a beveled edge (the condition I find most knives in), and I'm curious as to how all of you handle entirely replacing a knife's edge. Any tips on setting up a knife to work better for someone who you know won't sharpen it would be appreciated too - I've had to do this to nearly 30 knives myself so far, so I'm thinking I need to learn more about what I'm doing.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,408
    Plenty of talk on this subject. Just start with a low grit stone or a diamond plate. Maybe a belt grinder if available. For people who won't sharpen, maybe leave it with a toothier edge or teach them how to properly use a ceramic rod at least.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    1,481
    +1 with ThEory. On inexpensive knives, I do much of the work on belts sanders before putting a final edge on with stones. It's fast. If you're just doing a couple knives, I'd start with a coarse stone or diamond plate and finish with a 1 or 2 k stone on most knives.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    621
    Yup another +1...when friends ask me to sharpen their cheaper knives with non existent edges I set the new bevels on a diamond plate to save my stones then use regular progression but leaving a toothy edge

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    England
    Posts
    478
    If a knife is that worn down, wouldn't it need fair thinning too?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Ruso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    672
    If were are talking abt cheap stamped blades, most of them are already somewhat thin and the edge retention is already poor. I personally see it's being a waste of time to thin. But by all means it can be done if desired.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Scrap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    60
    These ARE mostly stamped/low end knives, plus a few of the overpriced brand you'd find at any Williams Sonoma. Thinning isn't really an issue and quite frankly isn't something I care to take the time for on these knives. I feel I should clarify for now that my current go-to is a pair of fairly low grit diamond stones, as I see no point in letting anything that got in that shape to begin with near my water stones. On a related note, would restoring a blunted tip be roughly the same as sharpening one in good shape? One of my own knives really needs this, but it being a 100+ year old knife I've been reluctant to just have at it until I grind in a new tip.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •