Quantcast
Pulled pork video - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Pulled pork video

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,629
    Quote Originally Posted by JDA_NC View Post
    You can do this in either an oven or a crockpot. Method and cook time would be relatively similar. I wouldn't use that much sugar if you're doing it in a crockpot though. You would not get that level of crust/bark like out of a smoker or oven.

    Cool video sw2geeks. The production quality for all your pictures etc are always really, really nice. This looks like an interesting spot with a lot of character.

    It's interesting to see a Texan's take on pulled pork too. Here in NC it is very, very uncommon to see such a heavy/sugar-filled rub. I'm sure it tastes good but it reminds me more of a brisket rub. We tend to keep it more simple so it's more about the pork + smoke (... and the delicious vinegar sauce you pour over/chop it up with, for real authenticity )
    FWIW, Texas brisket rubs used by many tend to have very little, if any sugar.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #12
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    915
    Do you have a recommended finish temperature? I pull mine out of the smoker at 180, or wrap it in foil at 160 before finishing in a slow oven for pulled pork

  3. #13
    Senior Member Chifunda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    322
    I pull my butts at 195*. If they're done before mealtime, FTC. (Foil, towel, cooler.) I run my smoker (Cookshack SM025) at 240* and use a mix of hickory and apple wood. Works for me.

  4. #14
    daveb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Just outside Tampa
    Posts
    931
    Quote Originally Posted by Chifunda View Post
    I pull my butts at 195*. If they're done before mealtime, FTC. (Foil, towel, cooler.) I run my smoker (Cookshack SM025) at 240* and use a mix of hickory and apple wood. Works for me.
    Same here, including the SM025. Great minds think alike When temp hits 195 I poke it with thermapen, the feel of the insertion is just as important as the indicated temp. Sometimes I go a little higher till the probe slides in like it belongs there. Hickory, Apple, Pecan, Peach all good woods for a butt or shoulder.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Chifunda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by daveb View Post
    Same here, including the SM025. Great minds think alike When temp hits 195 I poke it with thermapen, the feel of the insertion is just as important as the indicated temp. Sometimes I go a little higher till the probe slides in like it belongs there. Hickory, Apple, Pecan, Peach all good woods for a butt or shoulder.
    Yup. I always double check the temp indicated by the Cookshack/Maverick probes with my Thermapen. And like you, if I feel resistance, I'll take it up to 198* or so.

    Best advice to beginning smokers: don't try to predict doneness by time, e.g. 1 1/2 hrs per pound. It ain't a loaf of bread! A good instant read thermometer is your best friend when smoking. (I also use mine when baking bread. )

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    88
    Thank you sir for the help. I appreciate it!

    Quote Originally Posted by JDA_NC View Post
    I tend to keep mine simple and straightforward, and I never really make it with ketchup & mustard (because I like to be an elitist and turn my nose up to Western NC & SC BBQ )... but if I was going to be doing a central NC style sauce, I would definitely start out with a splash of bourbon - making sure to cook out the alcohol. I think that would be nice and it's a good excuse to make sure you have some bourbon in the house anyways.
    Quote Originally Posted by JDA_NC View Post
    Eastern NC BBQ sauce is at heart an extremely simple thing. Most who talk about 'secret ingredients' are just BSing. I won't give you an exact recipe because it really is something you'll want to play with to your own tastes. A lot of people who don't grow up with this type of barbecue might find such a strong vinegar flavor over powering.

    At its base it is: apple cider vinegar, salt, cayenne, red pepper flakes and black pepper. You might want to add water to dilute it a bit and there are other things like lemon juice, wooster, hot sauce, paprika, brown/white sugar or molasses, celery seeds, onion & garlic powder etc to mix it up with. It's well known many BBQ joints enjoy a little MSG here and there, if you have fish sauce you could even throw a tiny bit in for that extra umami. That's it though. Whisk it in a bowl, adjust levels to your taste and then store for a day and taste again.

    If you want to play with it further - and straight vinegar is a little harsh to your palate - another variant found in central NC is basically the same but with the addition of ketchup and/or yellow mustard (always more ketchup than mustard), thrown in a pan and let to simmer for a few minutes to dissolve. Since you're heating that up, you could play with small amounts of aromatics like clove or star anise to mix it up more.

    It's nothing set in stone though. Have fun with it!

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts