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Thread: Mirin question

  1. #11

    ecchef's Avatar
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    Mutual Trading Co. has a vast array of products. The closest one to you would be LA. See if they'll ship.
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  2. #12
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    Mirin is not saki. They are two different products, made differently. How can I explore true Japanese cuisine without true Japanese ingredients?
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Mirin is not saki. They are two different products, made differently. How can I explore true Japanese cuisine without true Japanese ingredients?
    Don't get me wrong, Mirin is one of the most used ingredients in Japanese cuisine. However, I would say that most restaurants don't buy super premium Mirin - depending on the dish, you could use as little as a few tablespoons, or as much as several cups. At $5 a bottle (or more) for the real stuff, it would become prohibitively expensive to use. I would just try using one of the commercially available Mirins and see what you like. Personally, I'm using Kikkoman right now. I've used Takara before. I don't use the cheap stuff since they're mostly HFCS. But I don't spend a lot on the stuff.

    Quick question: Why did you not want to buy Mirin with salt added? You would eventually have to add salt to almost any dish you wanted to make.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Don't get me wrong, Mirin is one of the most used ingredients in Japanese cuisine. However, I would say that most restaurants don't buy super premium Mirin - depending on the dish, you could use as little as a few tablespoons, or as much as several cups. At $5 a bottle (or more) for the real stuff, it would become prohibitively expensive to use.
    The salted and seasoned fake stuff costs more than that. A 1 liter bottle of Kikkoman aji-mirin at my local asian supermarket costs $8.49.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  5. #15
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    Michael, when soy sauce is in the dish there is already plenty of salt.
    Ecchef, I will check them out and see it they can help.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  6. #16
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    i think liquor laws make it hard to get mirin in the states but anywho i think this is atleast what you are talking about/trying to find...

    http://www.hakusenshuzou.jp/goods/list01.cgi

    or this
    http://delicious.serai.jp/default/hakusen-01.html

  7. #17
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    That is perfect, butt the $40 shipping charge is a little much!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  8. #18
    Spike -

    Have you considered using a low sodium soy sauce?

    Nonetheless, I called Takara Sake in Berkeley. The person I spoke with said that they do not add salt to their consumer Mirins. (Their website does not identify ingredients.) I read elsewhere that their Takara Masamune Mirin does not include salt. And, I also spoke with the Japanese Market I used to work at and was informed that the non-Aji Mirins (which takes out the Kikkoman Aji Mirin) do not include salt (I think the Takara Masamune Mirin is in this style). So,I would look for Takara Mirins - they're widely available here in California.

    And with respect to your concern about being authentic, Takara in Berkeley is an offshoot of one of the large sake producers/distributors in Japan. The facility has been in Berkeley for at least twenty years.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  9. #19
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    Thanks, Michael, the shipping is rather brutal, butt I went ahead and ordered a bottle anyway!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  10. #20
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    The mirin arrived today, and it is very distinctive in flavor. I am doing Greek style chicken tonight, butt I'm looking forward to some teriyaki with this!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

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