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[NEED] Knife Handle Sealant
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Thread: [NEED] Knife Handle Sealant

  1. #1

    [NEED] Knife Handle Sealant

    Hey guys,

    I made a little handle for one of my knifes. Since the handle is ebony cocobolo I figured tung oil as the sealant would suffice... I was wrong. Within a week of use the handle was bare. Can you suggest a good sealant? I was thinking about wax, but I dont know which one to get.

    Handle:

  2. #2

    HHH Knives's Avatar
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    I like Ren. Wax. heres a link. http://usaknifemaker.com/lube-wax-lo...-7-oz-can.html

    Nice looking handle as well, great job!

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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  3. #3
    Thanks man, its in the mail!

  4. #4
    Senior Member richinva's Avatar
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    On most cocobolo I usually apply a couple of wash coats of shellac, after cleaning with acetone. Then I'll apply Ren wax. The wax will wear off eventually, but is easily reapplied. Often you can just use the palm of your hand to "re-oil" it. I've always thought well-used cocobolo didn't need much of anything...........

  5. #5
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Cocobolo is stable to use without any sealant. Renaissance wax is OK, but will get scrubbed off after a few washing. I would just leave the handle as is. It will be years before you would need to replace it (if ever if you dry it after the use and wash).

    Shellac is not water-proof. To really seal your handle, you need to use poly and build up a fairly thick film. It will kill the natural feel of the wood though.

    M


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    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Some oily type woods don't really need much. Having said that, I like to use a wiping gloss poly, essentially a thinned varnish, because it penetrates and leaves a natural wood feel but offers some additional protection; topped coated with Renaissance wax. I don't think shellac will help much except on violins.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  7. #7
    Senior Member richinva's Avatar
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    The shellac is not intended to be waterproof. It's purpose is to prevent/slow the natural oil from coming back to the surface. The poly will eventually wear off from water and wear. Violins only? You're joking, right?
    :

  8. #8
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    ...just an obscure reference to the french polish technique used on some string instruments. Shellac has its uses but I have a preference for a finish taught by an old fashion woodworker; multiple layers of varnish, thinned and sometimes with a few drops of linseed oil. It penetrates and hardens at and below the surface to avoid a heavy laquer type feel. I personally have not used shellac in years.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  9. #9
    Senior Member richinva's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Seth;128163.....I personally have not used shellac in years.[/QUOTE]
    That's too bad.
    Another advantage to shellac is that it seems to set more of the true color as opposed to the darkening effect that oil on raw wood gives.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    I agree about the darkening. I tend not to use oil anymore either; just the thinned version of a clear varnish. The thing I remember about shellac and the french polish thing is that the shellac can dry so fast that when it is applied with a ball of fabric it dries by the time you come to the next circular motion. (I know we are OT here.) This would create hundreds of layers of suminigashi finish that would give a depth to the finish. With some woods like ebony, I don't use any finish, or maybe a bit of wax. I don't have my knives under a constant stream of water like the fish guys do, so this works.

    Shellac....hmmm. You are causing me to think about this.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

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