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Thread: Help me choose/critique my first "custom" knife set!

  1. #11
    Very interesting stuff, thanks a lot guys.

    Conclusions so far:

    Switch from MAC bread knife to Tojiro bread-knife.

    Switch from bamboo board to Boardsmith. Any recommended wood/size? Right now I'm looking at the Maple 12x18.

    What I really need a suggestion for is sharpening stone(s): any particular ones I should get as somebody new to sharpening (eager to learn, mind you, I have a penchant for these kind of things) e.g. number of stones, grit for these said stones, recommended brands etc.

    Also, what is the difference between a sharpening stone and a knife steel? I was once told a knife steel doesn't actually remove metal and instead only re-aligns the blade and my current impression is that a sharpening stone will actually remove material from the edge, but the more I see these forums talk of sharpening stones I feel like I'm getting something wrong here.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaarx View Post
    Very interesting stuff, thanks a lot guys.

    Conclusions so far:

    Switch from MAC bread knife to Tojiro bread-knife.

    Switch from bamboo board to Boardsmith. Any recommended wood/size? Right now I'm looking at the Maple 12x18.

    What I really need a suggestion for is sharpening stone(s): any particular ones I should get as somebody new to sharpening (eager to learn, mind you, I have a penchant for these kind of things) e.g. number of stones, grit for these said stones, recommended brands etc.

    Also, what is the difference between a sharpening stone and a knife steel? I was once told a knife steel doesn't actually remove metal and instead only re-aligns the blade and my current impression is that a sharpening stone will actually remove material from the edge, but the more I see these forums talk of sharpening stones I feel like I'm getting something wrong here.
    I think a good starting stone set it that gets good reviews and the one I have ordered is:

    beston500, bester 1.2k, rika 5k

    A sharpening rod (honing rod) will realign your edge if the metal splits or wires it will not sharpen! it will also bring your edge down to its grit. so try to get a 1.2 or 2k rod. great for quick go but if you think your knives are dull use the stones.

    edit things to consider: you really don't need the beston500 unless your knives are really dull or you want to re profile the edge. You will also want a flattening stone (DMT or Atoma). Flat stones are important. Jbroida has some good videos out there. youtube jknifeimportant I believe.

    edit edit: for anyone who is as excited as me. my stones should be in tomorrow!

  3. #13
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    I second the TKC 240, tojiro itk breadknife and sanituff or boardsmith over bamboo. Or is it third them? I'm thirding them.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  4. #14
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaarx View Post
    ...Switch from bamboo board to Boardsmith. Any recommended wood/size? Right now I'm looking at the Maple 12x18....
    Good choice, but I'd go larger. Get the biggest board that will fit comfortably on your counter top. You won't regret the extra space, but you will regret not having enough room to work comfortably.
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  5. #15
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    I think I got the 16 x 22. Love the size for working on it, though it is not something you can just tuck away when not using it.

  6. #16
    Yeah, cutting boards are just better as big as possible. Cleanup isn't as quick, but who are you, Sandra Lee?

    Stones...Well, usually I tell people to get cheap decent stones to learn on. But you seem the type to read the book, then jump into the middle of the pool, which is commendable. Here's the basic rundown: You need a coarse stone, fine stone, and something to maintain on(which in the case of these knives would be best as a strop).

    There are a billion choices, but below 1k is a little aggressive for your needs, so your coarse stone, whichever you choose, should be between 800 and 1500 grit. Then your fine stone needs to be anywhere from 4k to 8k, depending on a lot of considerations.
    You can choose if you want a stone that wears fast or slow, cuts fast or slow, is muddy or not, wide or narrow, requires soak time or not. There's a lot of choices, it's a fun part of the hobby to get lost in.

    Your stropping setup ideally would be a good leather strop on a stable base, a fine but aggressive compound(.5 micron or less), and something to deburr on(URH felt, rubber, wine corks).

    I got my start using what my sushi bar had lying around. Which sucked. I started my real journey with just a 2k shapton pro, and stropped on cardboard box flaps.

  7. #17
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    For stones, get a King combo 1000/6000 first, practice and then move on. I find the King combo best for starting out as you don't really need a 500 unless you have really dull/chipped blades. After that, either the tried and tested bester+rika or else Jon's gesshin lines have been well received.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Welcome!

    Why not get a sani-tuff board, and then upgrade later to a Boardsmith?

    Bamboo has it's allure, and I"ve never used that brand, but the glue in bamboo boards is hard on knives...real hard. Also, the sound they make when chopping is unbearable.
    Making your own board is a bit of work, but worth it. And if you are worried abouts glue, you could always use hide glue.

  9. #19
    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    for cutting boards, bigger is better among a few other things I would get some cheap knife to practice on the stones though, until you develop muscle memory and coordination. I learned the hard way.

  10. #20
    Why would you really need bread knife?

    In sharpening, go cheapest way possible first. You may not like it, or you may find a guided system fits your ammount of time/space better. King 1k/6k combo is good to start.
    Connect it with newspaper and you can get a knife decently sharp without having 3 separated stones. There is also 400/2000 combo stone from shapton, which is ceramic and would stand up better to learning-abusing, but I dont know where to buy one.

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