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  1. #11
    Senior Member Mattias504's Avatar
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    Didn't Mizuno recently change the grind of their knives? I remember seeing a post about them becoming more Heiji-like in that they had big bevels towards the edge. If this is the case, thats awesome.

  2. #12
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattias504 View Post
    Didn't Mizuno recently change the grind of their knives? I remember seeing a post about them becoming more Heiji-like in that they had big bevels towards the edge. If this is the case, thats awesome.
    on mine, at least, the big bevel is completely cosmetic.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TamanegiKin View Post
    Hi all,
    I will be looking for another Gyuto in the next couple
    months. I'm interested in something with a more flat
    profile. It seems from pics at least that Mizuno, yoshikane, aritsugu and masamoto ks would all be potential candidates. Most interesting at this point are the Mizuno akitada blue 2 or a yoshikane in skd.
    I'm curiouse if anyone has any insight on these two knives
    and if they do in fact have a flatter profile/less belly compared to say a konosuke or suisin. Also, is there a term for gyutos with this shape? I've heard the term torpedo but that's it.
    Thanks in advance.
    Yoshikane SKD from Epicurean Edge is VERY flat for a long stretch starting at the heel. It is a massive knife. This western 270 mm measures 274 mm heel to tip. I was told the wa-version is also a true 270. It will wedge more than the Konosuke and it is pretty thick at the spine until the very tip where it thins out nicely. It would be better if it thinned out an inch earlier, imo. It is a nice knife though and for the record the secondary bevel is really cut the way it looks like it is.

  4. #14
    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    yeah, Mizuno's are old school favorites. You might also look into the Masamoto, one of the flattest in my collection

  5. #15
    Senior Member UglyJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattias504 View Post
    Didn't Mizuno recently change the grind of their knives? I remember seeing a post about them becoming more Heiji-like in that they had big bevels towards the edge. If this is the case, thats awesome.
    Yes. I sharpen the whole bevel (hamaguriba on both sides) when I sharpen the knife and then use an asymmetric microbevel. Some people ignore the bevels and sharpen like a regular gyuto. I did this for a while at first - now I'm convinced that this is the incorrect way to sharpen this knife. Convexed knives cut like no other.

  6. #16
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UglyJoe View Post
    Yes. I sharpen the whole bevel (hamaguriba on both sides) when I sharpen the knife and then use an asymmetric microbevel. Some people ignore the bevels and sharpen like a regular gyuto. I did this for a while at first - now I'm convinced that this is the incorrect way to sharpen this knife. Convexed knives cut like no other.
    Joe,
    How do you hamaguri the sides of a knife that doesn't have a clean shinogi? Do you thin a little, then lift up by a degree or so and sharpen the edge, then blend like Jon does on the single bevels?

  7. #17
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    there are no bevels on mine, it was just polished lines that have disappeared as the knife has patinaed. i couldn't feel them with a finger nail, and there was no visible change to the geometry of the blade corresponding with the lines. i'm convinced they don't actually exist, and are an artifact of how final finishing is done on the knife, if mine is anything to go by.

  8. #18
    Senior Member UglyJoe's Avatar
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    They are real. They are just very minor. When I sharpen on the stone if I am very careful and use no mud I can hit the original line. But the angle is so flat that any mud on the stone will scratch up the flat of the blade, and any wobble will round off the shinogi. But that's where the grind starts on the knife. I lay the blade flat and put pressure halfway between where that shinogi is (or was) and sharpen. You basically only hit below where that line was, though as I said mud will make the flat a mess. Then I lift the spine a hair and sharpen again. This hits most of the hagane and creates an edge. Once I've developed the edge I blend the two together, just like with a traditional knife. This leaves the main bevel as a convexed bevel basically from where that shinogi was down to the edge, no corners. 35* microbevel on the outside of the edge and the knife is ready to go. Cuts much thinner than it actually is and that convex shape really makes the knife feel alive.

  9. #19
    Senior Member UglyJoe's Avatar
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    Here are pics of my Mizuno, and you can see what I'm talking about.





    I used to actually polish the knife up to a nice kasumi finish, but the knife patinas so rapidly and so darkly that I no longer feel it's worth the time. It's polished up to a natural stone finish, particularly the edge. I didn't spend as much time on the flats getting the polish to look good, as I said it patinas just too darn fast. You can see on one side I've kept pretty close to the original "shinogi". On the other I haven't done quite as well but most of the mars above the bevel are due to stone mud and that being worked opposite to the way i'm used to working with single bevels. As is if I went back and hit this with a beston 500 with no mud I'd get scratch marks only below where the "shinogi" line is. So yes, it's real. And maybe if I were Jon or Dave or KC I could have done the sharpening and kept the shinogi transition clean and a straight line... Alas, I'm not.

    Great knife.

  10. #20
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    there is no shinogi line, fake minor or real on my Mizuno. there is a polish line that corresponds with no discernible changes to blade geometry. kudos for finding something that works for you and your knife. personally, single bevel knives with uneven blade roads and shinogis are bad enough for me as is. you've thinned the knife, which is of course going to increase performance. i have no interest in thinning mine. it's why i have a laser.

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