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Thread: Gyuto help

  1. #21
    Senior Member TamanegiKin's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info y'all.
    -Joe, is your Mizuno 240 or 270?

    Is JCK THE place to get a Mizuno?
    The Masamoto is tempting but I think I'd like to try
    a blue2 knife next in line. All my knives are white 2 or varying
    stainless and semi stainless steels.

  2. #22
    Pretty much. I think you can order it direct from Mizuno, but I think the price actually ends up being MORE if you do that. Other than that, I don't really remember seeing Mizuno anywhere else on the web.

    Mine is 270.

    ER, yes, the knife is thinned a little bit, but I really haven't thinned it that much relative to how it was. The increase in performance comes from the convexed geometry and the "primary" edge being at a more acute angle than it was when I had sharpened it before. I've found myself falling into the camp of convexed geometry being better than anything else. It just cuts really, really well. We'll just have to disagree about the line. It's not polished in, it is generated from two planes meeting at an angle... it's a bevel. That angle is nearly flat though. You could round of the line and it would look like any other gyuto, but then you could do that with a deba or yanagi as well. My point is the bevel is flat from there to just below the lamination line, then convex to the edge. That's how the knife came from the factory for me, and that's how it was intended to be sharpened, IMO.

  3. #23
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    my edge is convexed too, and i just about have the flats of the blade on the stone when i sharpen, and my bevels are pretty tall. the knife cuts really well. i really think the thinning is what is doing it, though. it doesn't take much to make a difference. i really think removing thickness behind the edge is a major improver of cutting performance. our knives are a bit different, if i remember correctly, and mine is very thin behind the edge already, so who knows.

    JCK is definitely the place to get the mizuno.

  4. #24
    Regardless, it's a great knife. I wish more people would give it a chance. I think a lot of laser lovers would be shocked out how well the Mizuno performs. And from everything I hear, the Shig as well.

    IMO, the best "normal line" wa-gyutos from everything I've pieced together (and I've not actually used most of these, so take it with a grain of salt) are Shigefusa, Mizuno, DT ITK, Konosuke, Masamato, and Heiji. Not in any particular order.

  5. #25
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    definitely great, great knives.

  6. #26
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i just wanted to say that it's fine knife that can be approached from two very different directions with the same result: fantastic performance.

  7. #27
    I love my Mizuno Akitada Blue which I have had for probably three years now I think (maybe longer).

    Wouldn't part with it especially as it has a "Fish" handle which is pretty. I am working the steel very slowly with some stones I got that will 'mist' the whole thing and make it look, well, different.

    I'll post pictures when I finally finish it

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