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  1. #11
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    as she's very knowledgeable person.
    I've seen many very knowledgeable people too, but none of them gives a crap about knife maintenance!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LKH9 View Post
    I've seen many very knowledgeable people too, but none of them gives a crap about knife maintenance!
    We knife aficionades are a rare breed indeed. It is too easy to forget when one spends so much time in forums with like-minded people.

    A suggestion: She likely already has got good knives or can buy them herself. How about a really nice matched set of high quality waterstones instead? That is not something you can buy everywhere, not even in a first rate cooking supplies shop.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by mhpr262 View Post
    How about a really nice matched set of high quality waterstones instead?
    Oh yeah, that'd be nice, and you could give her a matching vacuum and iron to go with them. Stick with your plan Anton. It doesn't matter what she does with it afterward, she'll recognize the effort that went into it and cherish it for years.

    Be well,
    Mikey
    Available handles- [url]http://s64.photobucket.com/user/mkriggen/library/Available20handles[/url]

    Rule #1- Don't sweat the small s%&t, rule #2- It's ALL small s%&t
    Mikey

  4. #14
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    Ya, just give her a good Japanese stone or a ColdSteel knife.

    Seriously, traditional Japanese knives are going to get ruined 100% by untrained/uneducated users, you know how chippy they are, do you? Knowledgeable doesn't apply to knives, people have been taking it for granted for centuries. I don't care how knowledgeable you presume she is, but if she can't take care of her kitchen knives, she's just a typical ordinary person in my eyes.

  5. #15
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    I think the man said he wanted to buy a nice knife, rehandle it himself and provide it to his parents to present as a gift to an esteemed friend?

    Very laudable.

    Perhaps one of the knives with an engraved chrysanthemum would fit the requirement? I don't remember which knife (or knives) this would be just remember coming across one that the 240 was engraved with a dragon, the 210 with the flower. Remember thinking that would be a nice gift for my mother.

    Good luck in your search.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  6. #16
    @OP

    Maybe include a two sided stone, some rods, oil, cloth, and a well fitted box (or scabbard with stand)?

    The thought here is if she does know how to properly care for her blades she will appreciate the accessories. And, if she doesn't, then she will have everything she needs (basically) to keep it in good condition. And, it becomes a matter of tangential learning (and no one can say you didn't provide everything needed with the gift to treat it properly, if she ends up destroying it).

  7. #17
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    cutting performance is not going to matter. just ask your mother what she thinks is the prettiest of some expensive knives. that will be the one to get.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    cutting performance is not going to matter. just ask your mother what she thinks is the prettiest of some expensive knives. that will be the one to get.
    I think he should gift her a great cutter. On the off chance that she got someone close to her that knows about knives.

    A year later someone telling her "This is expensive mediocrity" and "Why didn't you care for this beauty" will create a different reaction towards the gift givers.

    Also the enlightened look of a person making for the first time a cut with something really sharp is well worth.

  9. #19
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    Consider one of the super-etched Saji blades as well, if you can find a dealer. They might have a bit more texture going through food but they look pretty sweet and have (imo) nice profiles.

    http://knife-gallery.com/?pid=62313553 not sure where else to find them, but I'd be quite pleased if someone got me one of these.

    And ignore the people who tell you to forgo a good knife as a gift. It's a gift and she can use it as a paint scraper if she wants, though in the spirit of being a good recipient she might take some interest in it and you can make yourself available as a convenient reference for knife care and use so she doesn't have to wade in misinformation.

    I was going to give a gift of a nice knife not long ago, but discovered the recipient had no interest in knife care and was apparently talented at destroying knives (chopping on tile sometimes even). The gift obviously would not have been appreciated so I didn't bother.

  10. #20
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    Also the enlightened look of a person making for the first time a cut with something really sharp is well worth.
    You don't need to spend over 400$ to buy something decently sharp to give to someone, any blades can be made into razors and cut things like butter, the only difference is the edge retention.

    And ignore the people who tell you to forgo a good knife as a gift. It's a gift and she can use it as a paint scraper if she wants, though in the spirit of being a good recipient she might take some interest in it and you can make yourself available as a convenient reference for knife care and use so she doesn't have to wade in misinformation.

    I was going to give a gift of a nice knife not long ago, but discovered the recipient had no interest in knife care and was apparently talented at destroying knives (chopping on tile sometimes even). The gift obviously would not have been appreciated so I didn't bother.
    What are you trying to tell here?

    The issue here is, don't give a premium hand-forged knife to an unknown person, it's 100% going to get ruined, and it also destroys the hard work of the craftsman who crafted the knife, even though you paid for it. It's a total disrespect to the artist. If the knife is a mass-produced stuff, even if it's over 1000$, then I won't give a **** about that. Every single premium Japanese knife is painstakingly crafted with blood and sweat, it has the craftsman's 'spirit' in it. Please respect that.

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