Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28

Thread: Deba?

  1. #11
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,135
    Quote Originally Posted by Boondocker View Post
    thanks for the links. they remind me of when i used to spend all morning watching itisan18 videos on youtube. Its nice to see them done, but without narration or somebody explaining WHY they are doing each step the WAY that they are doing it I don't feel like I'm learning everything there is to know. I know the procedure of breaking down a fish in that style, at a previous job wed get many large fish that I would use my deba for (grouper, sea bass, snappers). But at that time the only people I knew that I could physically talk to about it were of the mindset that its going to chip going through large fish bones and that it wasn't worth spending more than 100-125 on a deba. I'd like to really dive into the use of these knives (it doesnt hurt to know what the **** you are doing in a pro kitchen either). I am certain there is a specific technique around going through the ribs that works with the blade structure and what not.

    And why do those guys never wipe their knife in those two videos. It bugs me when people do that at work too. Dirty knives cause the flesh to stick when you are slicing and thats far from ideal especially with delicate fleshed fish.


    As for garasuki/honesuki. Have these been around as long as the traditionals. What did they use for birds before the sukis?

    A current coworker suggested this book http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Kitch...apanese+knives. Its not too expensive and I want to know what the hell im doing before I open up my next single bevel knife.
    I guess you didn't see me wiping the blade at :25 and 1:40 and 3:31 in the second vid.

    At home well, you got me there I didn't wipe it off during the second fish until 4:11. See the towel?

    Ask me any questions on the why I do any of it in that way and I'll try to help. I'm a copycat myself so when I see something, I just know how to do it. That's just how I've always learned, never went to culinary school or anything. Most people who post questions on the channel get a quick response though.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    sydney,nsw
    Posts
    417
    Rick most likely you already know but you dont have to cut down on the spine so hard. Just feel it with your finger find the little spine disks and pop your tip in and it will seperate so easily and you wont do any damage to your edge and also get a cleaner cut because of minimal force. Thats just my opinion take it with a grain of salt.

  3. #13
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,135
    For that puny mackerel I totally agree. A bit overboard with the force on that one.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    90
    Ive always been taught to wipe after every cut, so that nothing builds up on the blade so the flesh doesnt stick to the blade. Less friction the better IMO.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Nmko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    305
    Wiping every cut is a bit OCD... i wipe maybe once to twice each fish depending on size. If your station is continuously wet ( i leave a tap dripping next to me, then just run it over your board and wipe down..) its a lot faster and easier, no friction issues too.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by Nmko View Post
    Wiping every cut is a bit OCD... i wipe maybe once to twice each fish depending on size. If your station is continuously wet ( i leave a tap dripping next to me, then just run it over your board and wipe down..) its a lot faster and easier, no friction issues too.
    unfortunately not currently possible. there are sinks I can set up on, but they have a lip on them and I hate that. I could make some sort of structure using a roasting rack, dish rack and cutting board perhaps? thatd put the board above the faucet or right at faucet level though.


    Hmmm...one day ill have a fish sink.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    sydney,nsw
    Posts
    417
    With benchs that are next to sinks and they have a lip at the front you just put 2 boards ontop of each other and it is around the same height as the lip and you push the top board as close to the lip as possible.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    sydney,nsw
    Posts
    417
    Also if you really want to wipe after each cut. Get a small gastro with water and a cloth in it and a dry cloth. Wipe with wet cloth and then use dry cloth. At the place I used to work we scaled, gutted and filleted every fish we got. And my chef was anal as with wiping your knife and board. He was a beast at filleting though watching him break whole yellowfin in like 2 minutes was awesome.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    90
    thanks for the tips, jai I'll give them a shot.

    We do have extra long boards that you can set up where they rest on the back rim of the sink, then on the lip in the front and sit at an angle. its not too bad for doing poussin but I prefer a flat board for fish.

    Has anybody else read that book? probably going to pull the trigger on it after the weekend

  10. #20
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    4,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Boondocker View Post
    thanks for the tips, jai I'll give them a shot.

    We do have extra long boards that you can set up where they rest on the back rim of the sink, then on the lip in the front and sit at an angle. its not too bad for doing poussin but I prefer a flat board for fish.

    Has anybody else read that book? probably going to pull the trigger on it after the weekend
    The book is well worth the price. It went out of print a couple of years ago, and used copies were selling for $100+.
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •