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what's the right tool for sharp my knifes for a santoku and a european chef knife? - Page 2
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Thread: what's the right tool for sharp my knifes for a santoku and a european chef knife?

  1. #11
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    If it's not traditional Japanese knife, you won't need waterstones for the rough grinding, just get silicon carbide + a good finishing stone, maybe waterstone here will be good for finishing.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by LKH9 View Post
    If it's not traditional Japanese knife, you won't need waterstones for the rough grinding, just get silicon carbide + a good finishing stone, maybe waterstone here will be good for finishing.
    are a silicon carbide (maybe a combo 400\1000? or 250\1000? or 400\800?) + finishing stone (2000? 1200? 1500?) enough? do I need steel with vertical grooves (for the maintenance) as well?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by luko View Post
    are a silicon carbide (maybe a combo 400\1000? or 250\1000? or 400\800?) + finishing stone (2000? 1200? 1500?) enough? do I need steel with vertical grooves (for the maintenance) as well?
    I dunno, but the common silicon stones I see are very rough, I don't know what grit they are. But that doesn't matter much, you only need a good finishing stone for making the microbevel, the final edge that you want.

    Use this setup when honing on your finishing stone. Grip the dowel/rod/chopstick/wood firmly against the knife body with both hands. This will guarantee a consistent angle and save your time.









    Get a grooved steel if you can.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Carburundum (SiC) stones are great for removing a lot of steel, and are indeed meant to be used with huge pressure. I use them for fat stainless European blades. Both the Victorinox and the Zwilling Motion series are another category. Geometry is rather thin, I would use coarse waterstones. And, again, forget about a steeling rod, it won't help you.

  5. #15
    very good advices guys. thank you

  6. #16
    Senior Member osakajoe's Avatar
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    Don't use training wheels. If your just starting learn, learn the correct way and making mistakes is the only way to get better. Get your hands use to the feel of sharpening and to keep a consistent angle.

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