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Thread: scorpionfish

  1. #1
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    scorpionfish

    i just got about 7 of these little guys in today. im curious to taste them and am looking forward to marinating the livers. they were very pretty but had quite a few barbs on them that caught me one time. i also bought one for my wife and i to cook at home tomorrow night.

    ill let you guys know what i thought of it after dinner tomorrow...enjoy




  2. #2
    Senior Member
    SpikeC's Avatar
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    Those little suckers are kinda evil looking!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  3. #3
    Nice. I cut four of those fish down about a month ago.

    They've been plentiful this summer and inexpensive. Are they from the West Coast?
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #4
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The family Scorpaenidae contains around 45 genera and 380 species.
    Characteristics

    Scorpionfishes have large, heavily ridged and spined heads. Venomous spines on their back and fins with a groove and venom sack. Well camouflaged with tassels, warts and colored specks. Some scorpionfishes can change their color to better match their surroundings. The stonefish is a master of disguise and deception, it looks like a piece of coral or sand covered rock. Thus he can blend in with its surroundings and go unnoticed by its prey.
    Ecology and range

    Most scorpion fishes live on or near the bottom. They lie in crevices, in caves and under overhangs. Range: Red Sea , pacific ocean to Australia, Hawaii. A few scorpionfishes (no lionfishes or stonefishes) live in the Caribbean.
    Behavior

    They feed on crustaceans, cephalopods and fishes employing a lie-in-wait strategy, remaining stationary and snapping prey that comes near. With their mouth they create a vacuum and suck prey in during a nearly imperceptible split-second movement (15 milliseconds).

    Some have algae and hydroid growth on their body surfaces( stonefish) and at least one species (Decoy scorpionfish Iracundus signifier) has a dorsal fin that looks like a swimming fish, a behavior similar to that of the frogfish. Some species (for example the weed scorpionfish) sway their bodies from side to side so they look like a piece of debris.

    Scorpionfishes are not aggressive, but if threatened they will erect their dorsal spines. If danger continues they flee, usually very fast but only for a short distance and then quickly settle back and freeze. The stonefishes for example ususally bury themselves in sand or rubble using a shoveling motion of their pectoral fins. In a matter of less than 10 seconds only the dorsal portion of the head remains exposed, some sand is thrown on top to further enhancing concealment. Some species like the devilfish have very bright red and yellow colors on the inner surface of their pectoral fins. Those colors are not visible when resting but are flashed if threatened.

    Scorpion fishes produce a floating, gelatinous mass in which the eggs are embedded.

  5. #5
    I'll see your scorpion fish and bid one Atlantic sculpin!


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  6. #6
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Raise California state fish the garibaldi[IMG][/IMG]

  7. #7
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    We have some from time to time at the place where I worked. Got them from Australia.. Didn't like it much though. Kinda tough, hard flesh, hard to describe it really.

  8. #8
    I love sculpin/scorpion fish. Flesh is finely grained and firm, similar in those respects to Ling Cod.

    The one thing I noticed though is that it has to be properly skinned so that the membrane between the skin and flesh is removed; otherwise, when cooked, it will cause the flesh to curl (toward the skin side). It's ok fried, better IMHO when cooked in a moist, gentle manner like steaming or poaching. It's great steamed whole, Chinese style.

    Bones make good stock because it's not a oily fish. The cheek meat on larger fish is excellent - nuggets of deliciousness.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  9. #9
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steeley View Post
    Raise California state fish the garibaldi[IMG][/IMG]
    Hey, we have a state fish also, the humuhumunukunukuapua'a. Haven't seen that on a menu, I think it's considered sacriligeous out here but maybe Alan knows more.



    Never had scorpion fish but it doesn't look very appealing...

    Stefan

  10. #10

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