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Thread: tip for home sous vide

  1. #11

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Heh, I started doing this a couple of months ago...very handy. I hadn't thought of it for chilling though. I also use one of those "rapid wine chillers" for defrosting...and chilling bottles of beer

    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    I don't know why I never thought of it before, but today I used my Poly Pro as a defroster.

    I'm making Carnitas tonight and wanted to pull some rib scraps from the freezer to marinate and cook them tonight. So I though, hum, I wonder how low the PS will go, turns out it will go to 32 C.

    Nice, so I put some water in a bucket and circulated the frozen (SV bagged) pork and within 20 minutes, the meat was thawed and ready for marinating.

    I'm now thinking the circulator could be used to quickly chill my stocks and large batch soups.

    Just throwing it out there.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  2. #12
    Senior Member DDPslice's Avatar
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    Oh wow very interesting concept (dethawing) i was also thinking about throwing in a vac sealed (glass/old/clean/wine) bottle of water with some tea leaves the next time i do some chicken and see how that comes out.

  3. #13
    Senior Member DDPslice's Avatar
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    Update:

    Tea was meh: really clear and defined but lacked overall complexity and watery on the mouth feel.

    Would not recommend garlic roasting(SV) still prefer PC for garlic but I will attempt again.

    Would recommend Wine bottles (vacuumed) with OrganicEVOO and herbs (rosemary) @140 for 2 hours ( I had chicken going) but I think shorter cook time is possible, I'll try to do a more empirical study in my next attempt. Whether vacuuming helps or not I don't know but I don't think so in this case.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeerChef View Post
    So for those using a food saver style vac sealer as opposed to a chamber vac your longer cook times need to be adjusted. When reading books like under pressure, or other books from a pro point of view, a major difference occurs with the negative pressure in the bag. A professional chamber vac will reduce the internal atmospheric pressure way more then a house hold sealer, and in effect changing the boiling temp of liquid. This will greatly effect the time it takes something like a pork belly to cook. Keller gives his belly 12h at 180, a home user will need more like 18h to get the same effect. Just thought I toss that out there for all yall. Happy sous videing
    This idea presumes that the food in the bag remains under vacuum. It doesn't. The food in an s.v. bag will be at precisely the same pressure as its surroundings. Sitting on your counter, it's at atmospheric pressure. In your s.v. bath, it's under atmospheric pressure plus the pressure exerted by the water at that depth. It's only under vacuum when it's in the vacuum chamber and the air is evacuated.

    S.V. cooking uses the temporary condition of the vacuum for one purpose: to evacuate excess air from the food bag. This reduces oxidation during cooking, eliminates insulating air pockets, and helps keep the bag from floating. That's it. There is zero effect on the pressure in the bag during cooking, and therefore zero effect on the boiling point of the food.

    The reason this is the case: a plastic bag is not rigid. If you put food in a glass jar in the vacuum sealer, it would maintain a vacuum inside. You'd know this, because it would hold its shape after the air has been evacuated and after the jar's been returned to normal external pressure. A plastic bag collapses. External air pressure pushes the bag against its contents (or against itself) with the force of external atmospheric pressure. That's why you see the bag suck down onto its contents when you let pressure back into the chamber machine.

  5. #15
    Senior Member DDPslice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulraphael View Post
    This idea presumes that the food in the bag remains under vacuum. It doesn't. The food in an s.v. bag will be at precisely the same pressure as its surroundings. Sitting on your counter, it's at atmospheric pressure. In your s.v. bath, it's under atmospheric pressure plus the pressure exerted by the water at that depth. It's only under vacuum when it's in the vacuum chamber and the air is evacuated.

    S.V. cooking uses the temporary condition of the vacuum for one purpose: to evacuate excess air from the food bag. This reduces oxidation during cooking, eliminates insulating air pockets, and helps keep the bag from floating. That's it. There is zero effect on the pressure in the bag during cooking, and therefore zero effect on the boiling point of the food.

    The reason this is the case: a plastic bag is not rigid. If you put food in a glass jar in the vacuum sealer, it would maintain a vacuum inside. You'd know this, because it would hold its shape after the air has been evacuated and after the jar's been returned to normal external pressure. A plastic bag collapses. External air pressure pushes the bag against its contents (or against itself) with the force of external atmospheric pressure. That's why you see the bag suck down onto its contents when you let pressure back into the chamber machine.
    You are correct

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