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Thread: tip for home sous vide

  1. #1
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    tip for home sous vide

    So for those using a food saver style vac sealer as opposed to a chamber vac your longer cook times need to be adjusted. When reading books like under pressure, or other books from a pro point of view, a major difference occurs with the negative pressure in the bag. A professional chamber vac will reduce the internal atmospheric pressure way more then a house hold sealer, and in effect changing the boiling temp of liquid. This will greatly effect the time it takes something like a pork belly to cook. Keller gives his belly 12h at 180, a home user will need more like 18h to get the same effect. Just thought I toss that out there for all yall. Happy sous videing

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    Your hypothesis is interesting but I don't see any support for it. What suggests that level of vacuum can be predictive?

    A strip sealer pulls a vacuum, though it would be difficult to measure. SV has enough time and temp variables, product thickness, et al. I'm not sure how a variable for vacuum could be included in any empirical way. 6 hours more? Or is it 50% more? What if it's a "good" strip sealer as opposed to "cheap" strip sealer? Keller's chamber sealer probably pulls more vacuum than mine - should I adjust a little bit?

    I'm not being contentious, just the SV tables make my brain hurt enough as is - I don't want to make it any harder.

    And a happy SV to you as well.
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    15 years of pro and home use of both levels of tech. That's why I know. Trust me

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    I've no problem with reaching back and pulling out a SWAG. When it's presented as such. Me thinks you are offering anecdotal experience as something empirical.

    I use a Sous Vide branded strip sealer (POS), within it's limitations, for catering and use a Weston strip sealer or VP112 chamber sealer at home. I've not found any reason to adjust timing for a SV product based on the sealing device used.

    YMMV
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  5. #5
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    Should it matter with sous vide? At the temperatures you're working at, you are far below the boiling temp of the liquid unless you pull and hold a tremendous vacuum. The only reason I can think of for it making a difference is that the lower boiling point allows for more vigorous convection currents at a lower temp.

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    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    I' agree with DavidB, I've been an early adopter of SV and used both a Clamp sealer (Original Foodsaver) and my chamber vac (VP 112) and have never heard about adjusting cooking times depending on which sealer is used. Not only that, once the food hits the warm/hot water, the bag will deform somewhat to the product being cooked probably equalizing any difference in pressure anyway.

    Also, around here if you think saying "I have 15 years as a pro", is supposed to grant you instant credibility, that and $.99 will get you a DD coffee.

    Welcome to the forum
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  7. #7
    Senior Member riba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    At the temperatures you're working at, you are far below the boiling temp of the liquid unless you pull and hold a tremendous vacuum. .
    Yeah, it would also be observable due to the formation of gas in the bag due to boiling...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    I' agree with DavidB, I've been an early adopter of SV and used both a Clamp sealer (Original Foodsaver) and my chamber vac (VP 112) and have never heard about adjusting cooking times depending on which sealer is used. Not only that, once the food hits the warm/hot water, the bag will deform somewhat to the product being cooked probably equalizing any difference in pressure anyway.

    Also, around here if you think saying "I have 15 years as a pro", is supposed to grant you instant credibility, that and $.99 will get you a DD coffee.

    Welcome to the forum
    I have no experience as a professional chef and no experience with sous vise but I did sleep at a motel 6

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    I will remain highly skeptical until I have a chance to try your beer and food the next time we make it to the Philadelphia area
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    I don't know why I never thought of it before, but today I used my Poly Pro as a defroster.

    I'm making Carnitas tonight and wanted to pull some rib scraps from the freezer to marinate and cook them tonight. So I though, hum, I wonder how low the PS will go, turns out it will go to 32 C.

    Nice, so I put some water in a bucket and circulated the frozen (SV bagged) pork and within 20 minutes, the meat was thawed and ready for marinating.

    I'm now thinking the circulator could be used to quickly chill my stocks and large batch soups.

    Just throwing it out there.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

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