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Thread: Seasoning pans and foods that kill seasoning

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    Yup, treat a De Buyer the way you would cast iron. I have all sorts of cast iron from modern Lodge to 100 year old Griswold and none of them perform as well as my De Buyer. Within 2 cooks I could fry and egg and it would slide around the pan like it was in a teflon skillet. I love my De Buyer pans!
    Kyle:

    Which DeBuyer pans do you have?
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #12

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    Edipis, they are awesome pans! Then again, so are vintage Lodge! I have them both, but I use the Debuyer more, so does my wife. It is a little lighter than the cast iron, and the handle length makes them easier to use as well.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Kyle:

    Which DeBuyer pans do you have?
    9.5" Force Blue that I got on sale from World Market for $20. Regular price is $40.

    12" Mineral pan from Williams Sonoma (~$80).

    I love both! I'll probably add another 8" or 10".

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by heirkb View Post
    I was using my DeBuyer pan today and it fried eggs so well and so easily that I figured I'd just use it to cook the rest of what I was cooking. I put some spinach in the pan and noticed later that the pan was looking really splotchy. I took the spinach out and rubbed a spoon around a bit and realized that the spinach had eaten the crap out of the seasoning. The seasoning was soft and easily came off. Have you guys had this happen? What is the deal?
    In case it helps, I seasoned it using the flax oil method that was posted on the earlier carbon pan thread (see here: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/20...ing-cast-iron/)
    If you put the oil on too thick or the pan was not perfectly dry that could cause some problems. If the seasoning fells soft or tacky you did not get the oil to plasticize properly-get it back in the oven at 475-525 for an hour or two. One pan I did is doing perfect, the other one, the one I did a mirror polish on- lifted right off. I went back to 320 grit and reseasoned it and its doing great. Oven cleaner will pull the defective season and any other crud off.

  5. #15
    Thanks for the comments, Jim. I put the oil on extremely thin in this case, because that's what it said to do in that blog post. I think the most that any pan was in the oven with heat on (at 500) was 1.5 hrs, but I did let the pans sit in there as the oven cooled down. I guess I'll give the seasoning thing one more try and then I'll try the gradual method

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    SpikeC's Avatar
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    I'm glad that I have been ignorant of the proper ways to do this. I just use my carbon steel wok and Griswold skillet and don't think about seasoning. They work fine for me.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #17

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    Here is a pic after I had scoured all the black stuff off mine. You can still see some on the sides, but underneath was still a type of patina. It works like a champ, still as non-stick as ever. I say go natural.


  8. #18
    I swear that thing looks cooler than half the things in the NYC MOMA. I'm not one to hate on modern art, but I really think museums are BS. Sorry for the off-topic. That was just a long way to say,"Cool ugly pan!"

  9. #19
    certain foods which have a lot of water content, especially vegetables, tend to release water and 'steam' instead of fry, especially of there isn't a lot of oil present. Even a well established seasoning job can have parts of it removed if you use a carbon or cast iron pan to cook things which release a lot of water and ends up as water based cooking and not just frying. spinach and other vegetables can contain a wide variety of acids and other chemicals which may interact with the seasoning. Those black bits all over your spinach are caramelized oil/seasoning, not exactly what I'd want to be eating.

    The way I clean the pans to minimize scrubbing and retain as much oil /seasoning is to add a little bit of water to the empty pan while the pan is still hot, the hot water softens food residues and lets the food particles unstick with less scrubbing. I let it sit for a few minutes until the food residues can be easily removed. Then dry it on the stovetop immediately. The sooner you do this after cooking the food, the easier it is. These pans work best if used mainly for frying meats or items with more oil and less water content. If there are a lot of vegetables or you will be adding liquid or a sauce, I generally use a different type of pot or pan.

  10. #20
    Thanks for the tips. For now, I'll stick to stainless for the vegetables and watery foods. The carbon pan fries beautifully, so it's worth it to have one if only for that.

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