Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: A Comparison of Popular Forms of Sharpening - Reference

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Btw, you left out the sharpener that is mounted on the back of a can opener.

    k.
    Yes, you forgot that one.

    And the "Performance" rating for that should be "CRAP."
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #12
    Yes, I do think it's an improvement! Good idea separating it out, the way it will(I assume) be done when the graph is integrated.

  3. #13
    Thanks for the feedback guys.

    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    I think a general guide like this would be good for chowhound, which is the form I think you are talking about.
    Very perceptive

    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Btw, you left out the sharpener that is mounted on the back of a can opener.

    k.
    I also left out a couple perennial favorites over on CH:
    1) swear up and down that your knives which haven't been sharpened in a decade are 'razor sharp' and get offended if someone implies otherwise
    Speed.........5
    Ease...........5
    Performance.-1
    Affordability..5
    Versatility....1
    2) buy all new knives, throw away old ones
    Speed.........4
    Ease...........4
    Performance.2-4
    Affordability..1
    Versatility....5

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,183
    Just a couple more points cowboyardee.

    (1) I thought I heard shun was discontinuing sharpening service, but maybe I am wrong. Regardless, some places such as Japanwoodworker provide free sharpening. You only pay postage, so some of the professional services can be quite cheap.
    (2) I wouldn't recommend adding this necessarily, but sandpaper is always an option. I think Chad Ward went into some detail about this in his book and offered it as a cheap option if a person doesn't want to invest in stones.

    Just thought I would mention it.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  5. #15

    ecchef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    In the Village.
    Posts
    3,538
    I think you should add another line: potential disaster factor.
    Some of these methods are very unforgiving. And some will ruin you blade even if used as recommended.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,183
    Quote Originally Posted by ecchef View Post
    I think you should add another line: potential disaster factor.
    Some of these methods are very unforgiving. And some will ruin you blade even if used as recommended.
    That's so true. Some sharpening tools are very unforgiving and completely inappropriate for certain types of knives. There needs to be a "Danger Will Robinson" category.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by ecchef View Post
    I think you should add another line: potential disaster factor.
    Some of these methods are very unforgiving. And some will ruin you blade even if used as recommended.
    It came up on the other forum - I had already excluded a belt sander from the list because the learning curve usually entails ruining some knives unless you're already quite good on stones (in which case you don't need a guide like this one), and that's usually a problem for home cooks.

    How would you score these devices in terms of disaster factor? That's not really a rhetorical question.

    My thinking has been that such a category is really difficult to score on its own. Look at other sharpeners. What's easier to destroy a knife with - stones or an Accusharp? The answer is gonna depend on the knife in question. Or consider a hone - it's very slow and occurs over period of years, but lots of people ignore their knife's heel and wind up leaving a lot of accordion cuts.

    My hope was that the 'versatility' category would give most of this information. But maybe we need another category to point out that being sloppy with a Chefs Choice electric sharpener can result in serious damage?

  8. #18
    I think the potential for destruction is part of "ease of use". None of these are difficult to get to work(you don't have to crank them), its difficult to get them to work properly.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •