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Thread: Whats your favorite super petty?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by spaceconvoy View Post
    I had a Konosuke HD 210mm wa-petty, just sold it because it was the classic jack of all trades, master of none... ...[/URL]

    That is where I was heading... Why do you guys need a 210 petty? I find it the most redundant knife (size-wise) out there. I think anything over 150 is where a gyuto comes into play or a short suji (if you do trimming).


    @spaceconvoy

    Wa handled petties (150mm that is) are fine but a handle has to be of a right size in relation to the blade and a hand of a user and I give a D-shape handle an edge over an octagonal. Your experience is probably due to the fact that petty handles on Japanese knives rarely matched to the knife (that has been my experience and I rehandled a few), so they are either too small or too big.

    M


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  2. #22
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seb View Post
    Isn't 'petty' really short for 'petite gyuto'?
    Lol. This whole time I thought it was for "petty" tasks. I suppose your suggestion makes a lot more sense.


  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Lol. This whole time I thought it was for "petty" tasks. I suppose your suggestion makes a lot more sense.

    Petty and petty chef or gyuto (150 or 180mm) are different things. Petty chef is much taller. Carter makes those.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  4. #24
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    Maybe it stands for 'petite sujihiki' then?

  5. #25
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    That is where I was heading... Why do you guys need a 210 petty? I find it the most redundant knife (size-wise) out there. I think anything over 150 is where a gyuto comes into play or a short suji (if you do trimming).

    I guess there are different ways of looking at it, but for me personally a 210 petty is the perfect length. It is small enough to use as a petty but big enough that if I occasionally need to do some fine slicing it can still do most things. If I did more slicing I'd buy a 240 suji but I need a petty/slicer more than a slicer/petty if that makes sense. Basically I don't think a 210 petty loses any of the precision of a 150, but it gives you a reasonably able suji too

  6. #26
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I love my pettys, but I find one thing kind of funny. Back about 6 months ago, I was trying to decide whether or not a 240 suji would be worthwhile for me, and EVERYONE said to "go big or go home". Then a couple months later, the 210 petty/suji came into vogue and now it's a must have, with 240s hot on its tail.
    This really shows two things; the ever changing trends in our knifeknut world, and how important it is to go with what YOU like. I love a 175 petty, while Marko would never buy one. I personally, would get zero use out of a 300 suji, while a guy like Rick might find it indispensable (I guess in his case it's his new 270 suji, but you get the point).
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  7. #27
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    I find my 210 suji/petty is perfect for peeling a large fruit while holding it in my hand or cleaning small to med pieces of meat, portioning small pieces of fish, etc.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    gyuto (150 or 180mm) are different things. Petty chef is much taller. Carter makes those.

    M
    Indeed. But a skilled knife maker might be able to make a better one.

  9. #29
    180mm gyuto is a very versatile knife. Finalizing logo, Steve, so very soon. Will send you my current logo for an opinion.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #30
    Senior Member chazmtb's Avatar
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    I just received my Hiromoto G3 210 Sujihiki/Petty. I is a very good complement to my other two knives that I use, a 270 gyuto and a 150 petty. I received it yesterday, and my wife and I prepared Tom Yum hot pot for about 15 family members yesterday. My job was to prepare the salmon and squid for the hot pot.

    I initially broke out the petty/suji to use. It was relatively thin, much thinner than a 210 gyuto, a Tojiro DP for example, would be. I think this is where the 210 suji/petty has an advantage over a 210 gyuto, especially for quick preps, and line cooks (I have never been a line cook so don't hold me to this). I did like the fact that the G3 was a mono steel, which was probably why it was thinner than san mai knives of the same price range.

    One thing was appearant was that OOB sharpness was not what I am used to, but hey it's a new knife and I am using it. After slicing the salmon into 1/4 x 3 x 1 inch strips, it was time for the squid to be cut into 1/4 inch strips. This was when I broke out my TKC 270 gyuto. The factory Hiromoto's edge took too much effort to entirely cut the squid into the strips without the outer membrane still sticking. The TKC did a good job, but for a slicing motion, I would rather have a really sharp 210 to cut a 3 inch wide squid into strips.

    I broke out the stones after dinner and proceeded to go 500, 1000, 3000, 8000 and strop. This was a quick sharpening job, with scratches and rubs from the 500 to 1000 stones all over the place, but I didn't care. The edge was much better, and push cut paper really well. However I will work on it a little more on the 500 stone to really thin and refine the shoulders a little bit.

    From initial use, I can see this knife being very practical, especially for slicing protiens. For vegetable prep, I would use a gyuto, but this can be very useful for every day home cooks like me.

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