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Thread: My Historical Finds (pic heavy)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by XooMG View Post
    Yes, kanji 漢字 in Japanese means Chinese characters.
    Gotcha.


  2. #12
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    sorry for never PMing you back KitchenCommander, thanks for the Hickory, from the giveaway, much appreciated, I have been so swamped with work I haven't even been able to use it, what is the steel in it do you know?


  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeHL View Post
    The letters are 小野式 which are Chinese, Tho plugin it in to Google you can find a bunch of blog posts in Japanese about the machine. Leads me to think that the machine is Japanese and not Chinese.

    You can still buy a new one on rakuten for $340!
    http://item.rakuten.co.jp/fbird/kj-seimen1/
    Well would you look at that.
    Perhaps not near as old as it first appeared haha. Mine might have some age, but if they are still making them its probably not as old as I expected. Still for that price I feel pretty good about it. I didnt pay anything close to $300.

    Thanks for the link. That was very helpful.

    And I apologize if I mixed up the characters between japanese and chinese. I'm not too familiar with either.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KitchenCommander View Post
    And I apologize if I mixed up the characters between japanese and chinese. I'm not too familiar with either.
    No need to apologize; they are the same. If the characters look complex like 漢字, then they are Chinese but Japanese use them and call them kanji. If they look simpler (curly like ひらがな hiragana or more angular like カタカナ katakana), they will be exclusively Japanese.

  5. #15
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    Thank you for clearing that up. I'll keep that in mind next time.

  6. #16
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    Wonderful explanation of a concept which can be difficult for westerners.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoqaVin View Post
    sorry for never PMing you back KitchenCommander, thanks for the Hickory, from the giveaway, much appreciated, I have been so swamped with work I haven't even been able to use it, what is the steel in it do you know?
    Your very welcome. Old Hickory (and Forgecraft too I think) knives are generally accepted to be simple 1095, or 1085. I tend to agree with that based on the experience I've had working with quite a few Old Hickory knives. Hardness is hard to quantify, especially for me, but I would say 57-58 maybe. Forgecrafts have been tested at 59-61, and these feel slightly softer. It should be very serviceable and gets quite sharp while holding a serviceable edge respectably well.

  8. #18

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    Aug 2014
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    Hi KC,

    Very nice finds/knives/tools. I had a neat little find myself today.....a vintage 12" (very thin stock) Chef knife marked : Landers Frary & Clark New Britain Conn.
    GRAND PRIZE/ST. LOUIS 1904. A little bit rusty but, I have no doubt it will clean up nicely. I'm thinking Vinegar bath. The knife has a unique round Wood handle.
    I suspect it's a "Rat tail" design. I got this knife for a song! My collection of vintage Chef knives continues to grow! It look something like this : http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...nt-style-chefs

    Regards,
    SixCats!

  9. #19
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    Very cool. Feel free to post a pic of the before and after. Or just the after. I find restoring knives to be very fun and fulfilling. Always looking for another diamond in the rough.

  10. #20
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    Update. It appears I messed up the photo of my wagon, so I have added a new photo of that. Also I have brought home another large chef knife. Bought it as a no-name chef knife because it was in good shape and I liked the handle scales on it. Once I brought it home I discovered a makers mark beneath the patina. It was very faded, but I got a bad pic of it just for my records. It is a Robinson Knife Co. brand. Only issue I have with it was it has a slightly wavy edge. There was a small hole in the profile, but I am sharpening that out, so that is only a temporary problem.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Robinson 10" Chef knife. Good condition. Still lots of life left. Nice profile with a generous flat spot. Still needs work fixing the edge though.
    [IMG][/IMG]
    Photo of the makers mark. It should be visible right in the shadow. If not I apologize, this was taken with an iphone camera.
    [IMG][/IMG]


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