Quantcast
Shapton glass stones- best combo of grits? - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Shapton glass stones- best combo of grits?

  1. #11
    not my favorites, but not bad stones by any means. I agree with other posters in that they work well on smaller double bevels than other things.

  2. #12
    Problem is all double-bevel knives will eventually require thinning behind the edge, which is essentially sharpening a very wide bevel... Hard stones aren't inherently "good for double-bevel knives," they're just adequate for sharpening small bevels.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by spaceconvoy View Post
    Problem is all double-bevel knives will eventually require thinning behind the edge, which is essentially sharpening a very wide bevel... Hard stones aren't inherently "good for double-bevel knives," they're just adequate for sharpening small bevels.
    I have to contradict. Having thinned a G-2 and many other knives to 5-10° per side the GS never caused any problems. The bevels are of even polish and wideness. Unless you are going to sharpen/thin KCMA style you don't have to worry about the GS not being adequate.

  4. #14
    They are pretty low feedback. I do like Shaptons, I learned to sharpen on a Shapton Pro 2k. Very long learning curve.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman01 View Post
    I have to contradict. Having thinned a G-2 and many other knives to 5-10° per side the GS never caused any problems. The bevels are of even polish and wideness. Unless you are going to sharpen/thin KCMA style you don't have to worry about the GS not being adequate.
    If you're happy with flat bevels, then yes, GS and other hard stones are perfectly fine... but all the knives I have are convex, and I want to keep them that way. You just can't do a proper convex bevel on a hard stone.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by spaceconvoy View Post
    If you're happy with flat bevels, then yes, GS and other hard stones are perfectly fine... but all the knives I have are convex, and I want to keep them that way. You just can't do a proper convex bevel on a hard stone.
    That's true. How do you keep your bevels convex? Soft stones or the mouse pad sandpaper trick?

  7. #17
    My guess is a belt sander, which is a very viable option. No stone is soft enough to convex an edge in it's own right.

  8. #18
    i convex on stones... its a compound bevel and some rolling action. I can do it on hard stones, but softer stones make it A LOT easier and better.

  9. #19
    Doesn't stropping on a semi-slack leather belt/strop put a micro convex edge on the blade? This is my understanding, but I may be wrong?

  10. #20

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •