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  1. #11
    Senior Member sel1k1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jag View Post
    try stropping on some leather or newspapaer if you don't have any
    I have been waiting on leather strops to restock at my local bladesmith Vulcan Knifeworks. I tried the newspaper on the 8000 after using it, I can never get it to lay down completely flat on the stone, always little dimple lines, the edge ends up cutting through on the dimple lines. On Monday I might be able to get a leather strop.
    (^.#)

  2. #12

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    I keep my edges on the push cut level by touching them up on the Sharpmaker with the UF rods. Works even with a Global thinned to 10° and microbevel at approx. 15°.

  3. #13
    Senior Member sel1k1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Do you deburr with cork or felt between stones?
    I have not been using the cork between stones for 2 reasons; I didn't notice a difference when I was using it before(but this was when I had just completed my stone set and very new to sharpening) and I ran out of corks. The felt I don't have either; where can I look for this preferably not online if possible so I can use it today or tomorrow?

    Have you put your Birchwood through your stones? How long is your edge lasting? How much are you using/rotating/alternating at work? I re-etched mine after sharpening it a few times to get rid of the scratch marks.



    (^.#)

  4. #14
    Senior Member sel1k1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    +2 on stropping. I use a felt block between stones to deburr. I do notice - and this may be a sign of a flaw in my sharpening, but it works for me - that I don't tend to get push cuts until I'm on my 5000x stones and higher. Like I said, I'm sure others can do it with a 1000x stone, but I don't expect push cuts till then. Even then I don't get good push cuts until I'm using my 8000x and 10000x stones. Then I get wonderful push cuts. But even with that said, once I use the leather and felt stropping pads the push cuts become really nice. Anyway, without seeing how you sharpen, those are my thoughts. I suspect that I could move from my 5000x stone to the stropping and get awesome push cuts, but I love to have an excuse to use all the stones, so I may be going overboard
    Ohhhh, so you are getting better push cutting with higher grits with addition of felt stropping? Is there a difference in stropping with leather or felt?
    (^.#)

  5. #15

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    The question is whether or not a more rounded edge is better for push cutting. After stropping you get a smoother edge, during the process you loose much of the bite. Jon told me that he doesn't like chrome oxide on a stropping pad because of the particles' shape, they are very round and take away most of the edges' bite.

    If we are talking about ripe tomatoes, in my experience either you have a very toothy edge with much bite or a highly polished edge. something in between doesn't work well for me.

  6. #16
    Senior Member sel1k1's Avatar
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    The edges do look very shinny with some bite on my fingernail and able to shave some arm hair. Do you use lighter pressure as you go up with in grit? Our on-vine tomatos were ripe, not very soft but ripe, our heirlooms were a bit soft.
    (^.#)

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sel1k1 View Post
    The edges do look very shinny with some bite on my fingernail and able to shave some arm hair. Do you use lighter pressure as you go up with in grit? Our on-vine tomatos were ripe, not very soft but ripe, our heirlooms were a bit soft.
    Light pressure is essential. You should be able to push cut soft tomatoes too. The firmer ones are certainly easier.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    It could be a dozen things.

    I also doubt that fugi suji ever will.

  9. #19
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I stop at 4000 with gyutos because I like the aforementioned toothier edge. Plus, I find them to be a little tougher.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  10. #20
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sel1k1 View Post
    Ohhhh, so you are getting better push cutting with higher grits with addition of felt stropping? Is there a difference in stropping with leather or felt?
    As far as a difference, I guess that I tend to start with the leather because I spray it with diamond spray. In some ways I think of that almost as a super high grit stone. Then I finish with the felt because in my head I imagine it tearing off any remaining burrs and leaving the edge as clean as I can get it. Then when I take that final push cut test it simply melts through paper.

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