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Thread: Pre-Orders for 52100

  1. #31
    I believe what you're seeing is the result of Shigefusa forging to shape, leaving the tang thicker and unground.

  2. #32

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    Probably, but it still answers my question. The transition to the bevels, which I just call the plunge cut for lack of a better term is up at the machi and the tang is not beveled. As the tang is unfinished, I suspect that blade was not intended to have the "machi gap" so you also wouldn't notice the fairly significant stepdown in spine thickness from the tang to the ricasso so much. I like the way that was done. Still a fair amount of meat on the tang and a nice smooth transition to the blade.
    Quote Originally Posted by dmccurtis View Post
    I believe what you're seeing is the result of Shigefusa forging to shape, leaving the tang thicker and unground.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Iceman91's Avatar
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    Really like how you did the tip on the suji Marko.

    Mike

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    Probably, but it still answers my question. The transition to the bevels, which I just call the plunge cut for lack of a better term is up at the machi and the tang is not beveled. As the tang is unfinished, I suspect that blade was not intended to have the "machi gap" so you also wouldn't notice the fairly significant stepdown in spine thickness from the tang to the ricasso so much. I like the way that was done. Still a fair amount of meat on the tang and a nice smooth transition to the blade.
    It's shaped by hand with a sen and polished by hand.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    Probably, but it still answers my question. The transition to the bevels, which I just call the plunge cut for lack of a better term is up at the machi and the tang is not beveled. As the tang is unfinished, I suspect that blade was not intended to have the "machi gap" so you also wouldn't notice the fairly significant stepdown in spine thickness from the tang to the ricasso so much. I like the way that was done. Still a fair amount of meat on the tang and a nice smooth transition to the blade.
    Well, you decided it had answered your own question. Doesn't mean it was correctly answered.

    One thing you have to get away from is shoehorning sword terms onto kitchen knives. They are unnecessary and often inapplicable. Here is Gator's chart for knife terminology for single bevel knives. Most of these also apply to double bevel knives.

    There is no plunge line/cut on a Shigefusa. "The transition to the bevels" is the entire blade face. Some western makers use plunge lines on kitchen knives, like Delbert or Haslinger. But most double bevel knives, Japanese or North American, the transition is smooth all the way from the edge to the spine as the blade gets thicker. How that transition is ground affects the performance of the knife. That is what we are talking about when we are debating flat grind vs convex vs blended bevels, etc.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #36
    Lookin good, Marko.

  7. #37

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    Funny......a number of those terms, are, in fact, the same terms used for swords. Shinogi, kissiki, sori, mune, to name a few. Just like a sen is also the name for a scraper used for shaping swords. My observation was that on that particular knife, they scraped/shaped the bevels all the way up to the handle and left the tang thicker and squared as opposed to continuing the bevels all the way to the end of the tang. That is more analogous to how a western integral knife is ground as opposed to how nihonto are shaped. That's all. Just putting into terms that I am familiar with. Just like I had a little light go off over my head when a figured out that the blended grind actually resembles a saber grind where the shoulder has been rounded over. I guess in Japanese terms, you would say that you smeared the transition between the kiriba and shinogi, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Well, you decided it had answered your own question. Doesn't mean it was correctly answered.

    One thing you have to get away from is shoehorning sword terms onto kitchen knives. They are unnecessary and often inapplicable. Here is Gator's chart for knife terminology for single bevel knives. Most of these also apply to double bevel knives.

    There is no plunge line/cut on a Shigefusa. "The transition to the bevels" is the entire blade face. Some western makers use plunge lines on kitchen knives, like Delbert or Haslinger. But most double bevel knives, Japanese or North American, the transition is smooth all the way from the edge to the spine as the blade gets thicker. How that transition is ground affects the performance of the knife. That is what we are talking about when we are debating flat grind vs convex vs blended bevels, etc.

  8. #38
    I know some of the terms used on knives are used on swords. I wasn't saying NONE of the terms apply, just some of the ones you have been using do not fit.

    As for your observation that they did not continue the bevels onto the tang...that is how it has been on every single tang I have seen. No point in grinding a bevel into something you are going to cover with a handle.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  9. #39
    A quick announcement, folks.

    On Monday or Tuesday, I will be sending two sujihiki for a private feedback, followed by a passaround gyuto (the following week). I will be making a list of people for passaround this week.

    In the mean time, I would like to start on some knives that were commissioned (for those who don't want to wait for passaround reviews). Heat treatment takes a long time (especially when you do one knife at a time) and making handles and sayas also takes a long time, so I better get a head start, before I get burried under work again.

    A profile for a gyoto, and a petty is finalized, a suji should be finalized within days. Heat treatment is finalized, and so is geometry and grind for all these knives. All knives will be hand-rubbed to 600 grit and hand-sharpened to about 3-5K.

    So, if this sounds like you would like to get on, please send me an email to marko@markotsourkan.com as
    my PM box gets full all the time, so email would be is preferable.

    For handle material, I am going to give you an option to choose your own. If you buy a block from Burl Source you will get a discount from Mark and a discount from me. This way, you can pick exactly what you like. Please contact me for details.

    Thanks!

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #40
    A correction:

    I am sending out two sujis and one gyuto, in addition to a gyuto I sent our for testing in August. These are to get a quick feedback on performance, profile, geometry, grind, fit and finish and to help me with making a a pass around knife - 275mm gyuto (260mm on the edge).

    I will make a list of people I will send the knife to sometimes this week. Stay tuned.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

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