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Thread: Etching Damascus

  1. #11
    Engorged Member
    El Pescador's Avatar
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    Del, I used the test knife last night and really love the way the damascus is being revealed by the patina. I was able to use the passaround knife and while i loved the heavily etched damascus, i prefer the much lighter etch. I find it subtle and elegant.

  2. #12
    Here's what I did with your dammy to get the pattern to show with out going deep,hell you can hardly feel when I was done.I finished the blade to 1000 then etched, sanded again with 1000,then etched, sanded 1000 again, etched, sanded with 1500, etched,sanded 2000.I was very happy with this finish but being that smooth the food sticking nazi would have a problem with it.

  3. #13

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    I prefer damascus that just barely shows the pattern.

    -AJ

  4. #14
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
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    One thing that has been suggested(off-forum) since changing to grind on my knives is to etch the flats the way I normlly do and lightly etch the bevel, that is etch it in such a way as not to affect performance at all.
    Thanks,
    Del

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

  5. #15
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    I guess that would be a way to get your hoochie-mama look and your performance, too since the flat part of the blade won't have much contact with the food. You're not gonna let this guy get his cake and eat it, too, are you?

  6. #16

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    I'm not going to argue against people's experience with etched damascus and sticking and what not, but I'm having a very hard time wrapping my brain around this idea. I've etched gazzilions a metal samples and can't believe there is any perceived texture. Granted, 90% of my samples were A) iron not steel, B) what you would call mirror polished, and C) my etchant was nitric. I'm not saying anyone is wrong, just not understanding.

    If you take the same knife, unetched and do your cutting tests, then etch the knife and do the same cutting tests, people can tell a difference?


    -AJ

  7. #17
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
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    Aj,
    My regular etch is deep enough to feel the topography, in other words over .001 inch deep.
    Del

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

  8. #18
    I really like the sounds of that Del. The separated zones of the etch would be cool...and unusual

  9. #19

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    Del is absolutely right. On a deep etched blade, your fingernail will skitter across he blade like driving on a road with rain grooves.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Delbert Ealy View Post
    One thing that has been suggested(off-forum) since changing to grind on my knives is to etch the flats the way I normlly do and lightly etch the bevel, that is etch it in such a way as not to affect performance at all.
    Thanks,
    Del
    I would love to see the flats etched and the bevel polished.That would be a unique look.

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