Quantcast
Coastline San Mai WIP
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Coastline San Mai WIP

  1. #1
    WillC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    herefordshire uk
    Posts
    1,576

    Coastline San Mai WIP

    I was not exactly sure where to post this as it finished. But as far as working feedback, everything is a WIP
    I got three knives out of this San mai billet. And the San mai looks nice but different on all of them, depending on the depth the blade and the grind. This one I think looks rather like a coastline.

    The Materials are a bit of a collection. I used up an old 300 layer billet of Mild steel and en45 for the outside layers. The core is en42J with the weld line punched up with a slice or 2 of 15n20.
    I've had mixed results with the non contasty damascus. On thicker blades you get an even pattern. Just couldn't get an even etch out of it on these thinner blades. It looks more like a crucible steel, with elements of pattern coming to the surface. This is probably telling me that the carbon has equalled out largely in the damascus. Anyway its subtle , I like it because of this but now I have some 15n20. I probably wont make it again.

    The Billet was forged down with approximately 20mm diameter fullers in the hammer to get the ripples.

    To the blade. Its a Bano Bocho, (I think). The Sharp is 185mm. 50mm deep at the back, 39 mm at the front. The blade is 2mm thick at the back tapering to 1.5mm. It light but doesn't flex too much. It balances 30mm in front of the handle.

    The Handle is a single piece of Maple bur 120mm long, with the tang epoxied in.

    I do all my grinding post HT on these types of blades.

    Blade was full flat ground to 0.25mm then the last bit is convexed, on the grinder then by hand whilst polishing, honing in between grits then convexing in. Final honing after the etch was done on a cheapo 1K water stone. Then a Dragon Slate razor hone with slurry, then water. Then course strop with Starkie blue. Then bare leather. Its fairly sharp. Some pics at last...










    All feedback most welcome.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    301
    WOW! That is a spectacular looking knife. I just love the "coastline" pattern of the lamination line and the very discreet damascus pattern. The profile also looks very useable and versatile and the handle is very nice and fits the knife perfectly. I am a bit curious about the "hunchback" on the spine just above the heel. Is this a particular design feature with this blade?

    Very nice work and a beautiful knife alltogether.

    DarkHOeK

  3. #3

    HHH Knives's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,813
    Awesome, I like them alot! Great job.

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

    HHH Custom Knives T Shirts.

  4. #4
    WillC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    herefordshire uk
    Posts
    1,576
    Thanks Guys. The Hunch is more out of necessity, its a meeting point of 2 angles. The blade tapering down and the taper into the tang has to go down slightly so the handle looks level when fitted. It could be blended in a bit more, but this doesn't quite look right. If I had a shoulder on the tang it could nearly disappear. I don't mind it too much, as a simple transition.

  5. #5


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Homeless, PA
    Posts
    9,442
    The san mai pattern is cool but what I notice here the most is your smithing/grinding skills, this knife looks to be thin in the right places or at least you're in the zone from what I can see here.

  6. #6
    WillC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    herefordshire uk
    Posts
    1,576
    Thanks Dave, I'm happy the way the grind turned out on this one. Its nice and even and thin behind the edge. I have done a Gyto and a Santoku out of the same billet. The Gyto has by far the most flex, could be a bit thin for the depth of the blade. I think i'll start going a tad thicker on the back for the narrower blades. For this 2mm seems to give it plenty of strength. I've had the "Thin is best" idea in my head getting started. It certainly a challenge forging and HTing then sub 2mm. But as Mark Pointed out to me, too thin, too much flex might give it a flimsy feeling.

  7. #7


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Homeless, PA
    Posts
    9,442
    There's a fine line between super thin and too flexy for sure. The 2mm mark is a good place to be at the handle/spine point and go from there.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,079
    That is a beautiful knife, and I like the simple yet classy look -- nice lines (including coastline). That tree trunk though makes the knife look huge.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  9. #9
    WillC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    herefordshire uk
    Posts
    1,576
    Thanks Mr Dinky, ha ha, I see what you mean about the log. But its only a little log really. Its got quite a "Butcher Shop" profile in that front/side view.

  10. #10
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Kerby, OR
    Posts
    3,449
    Very cool.
    Great looking blade.
    Bizarre but cool pattern in the steel (makes me think of a lava lamp)
    Beautiful handle.

    The photo with the log makes it look like a giant log splitting cleaver.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
    Phone 541-592-5071, Email burlsource@burlsales.com
    Visit our web store

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts