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Knife for the wife
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Thread: Knife for the wife

  1. #1

    Knife for the wife

    Hi all.

    Totally new here. My wife is the cook in the family, and as such is the main user of the knives. Right now we have a random array of garbage, and her favorite knife is a little knife that looks like a 5.5" Santoku style knife. She is very small (4'11") with very small hands.

    I have wanted to get her a real knife for quite awhile, and while we were at the State Fair, saw a Cutco dealer. She tried them out, and really like them. So we bought a Santoku style knife, a cheese knife, and some shears. Total was just under $200.

    I normally research everything well before I buy things, but these were for her, and she liked them. Well, I got home, and fired up Google, and read many bad things about Cutco, but some good things as well. But most say I overpaid for the knives. Well, we had a 15 day return policy, so we are returning them. I then learned all about Wusthof, Shun, MAC, Global, Victorinox Forschner, and Kyocera. I was really interested in the Victorinox Forschner because of the price, but I wanted her to try some out.

    Most said Sur La Table had a good selection, so we just went there tonight. We looked at 8" chef's knives (too big), 7" Santoku (too big), and 5.5" Santokus (just right). We (She) tried the Global, Shun, Myabi, and Wusthofs. She also tried a Kyocera and a ... forgot the name, but it was a bright color and very cheap (like $10)...Rikon something. She loved loved loved the Myabi Kaizen knife. It wasn't totally outrageous at $120, but still was more than the $30 Forschner. I know she won't like that one compared to the Kaizen.

    I have looked at Kaizen info, and it is sparse. Seems like a Sur La Table only model (which I'm leery off). The Sur La Table rep there said they couldn't sharpen it in house since it was ... I think an 11 degree edge.

    A couple questions. My wife and I aren't the best at doing the dishes right away, and it might be difficult for us to remember to clean it right away (just being honest). Is it worth getting this good of a knife for us? Is this that good of a knife to begin with? Is it bad that only Sur La Table sells this? I see they have a knife class and after the class you get to keep a Shun 6" knife. Seems like a great deal (seeing as my wife wanted to take the class anyway). Has anyone taken this? Do you think they would let us switch out knives?

    My friend says she has some Fiskar knives (which seem not to be sold stateside) and said she loves them because she has left food on them for 24 hours, and they are still sharp and rust free after 8 years. I was thinking ceramic might be the route for us, but unfortunately she liked the Miyabi, and said it was way sharper.

    Sorry about the long post and so many questions.
    Last edited by vfamily; 08-08-2011 at 11:01 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
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    There are some great stainless steel knives out there and you will be getting great recommendations soon.

    Post a final price point for the knife and anything else you want and you'll get advice real quick.

    Welcome!

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by jm2hill View Post
    There are some great stainless steel knives out there and you will be getting great recommendations soon.

    Post a final price point for the knife and anything else you want and you'll get advice real quick.

    Welcome!
    $119 - Miyabi Kaizen 5.5 Satoku
    http://www.surlatable.com/product/PR...Santoku-Knives

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Welcome to KKF v!
    Thanks

  6. #6
    Senior Member

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    Sounds like your wife is into fancy as opposed to performance. If that is the case, the Miyabi should be a good buy. You cannot beat a Forschner for value but those knives don't hold their edge long. Ceramic is too brittle. You can also consider the Gekko line at Japanese Chefs Knife that have the faux-damascus look: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html. I've used on of these and I found it was a very good performer for the price. If you don't want to sharpen your knives, they will get dull just like any others and we generally recommend whetstones, a professional sharpener with experience with Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Sharpening)/proprietor specializing in Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Imports).

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Sounds like your wife is into fancy as opposed to performance. If that is the case, the Miyabi should be a good buy. You cannot beat a Forschner for value but those knives don't hold their edge long. Ceramic is too brittle. You can also consider the Gekko line at Japanese Chefs Knife that have the faux-damascus look: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html. I've used on of these and I found it was a very good performer for the price. If you don't want to sharpen your knives, they will get dull just like any others and we generally recommend whetstones, a professional sharpener with experience with Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Sharpening)/proprietor specializing in Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Imports).
    It's funny because I would never describe her that way, but man did she like the look of the Miyabi. But she also said it fit her like a glove, and though the other ones (5.5") were too high up. Not sure what she meant by that though. Normally she is more function over form, but this time I think both were in this knife. You say ceramic is too brittle. Is it true it will hold its edge for 7 years? Because if it breaks in 3 or 4, and is only $50, laying out another $50 for a replacement is still cheaper!

  8. #8
    Senior Member

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    Feb 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by vfamily View Post
    It's funny because I would never describe her that way, but man did she like the look of the Miyabi. But she also said it fit her like a glove, and though the other ones (5.5") were too high up. Not sure what she meant by that though. Normally she is more function over form, but this time I think both were in this knife. You say ceramic is too brittle. Is it true it will hold its edge for 7 years? Because if it breaks in 3 or 4, and is only $50, laying out another $50 for a replacement is still cheaper!
    Most people I know break their tips and have other chips in the edge within days. It all depends on how careful you are and it doesn't sound like you're very.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Most people I know break their tips and have other chips in the edge within days. It all depends on how careful you are and it doesn't sound like you're very.
    Ahh, understood. I would say she is somewhat careful, but not super careful. I think we'll avoid ceramic. Thanks!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Sounds like your wife is into fancy as opposed to performance. If that is the case, the Miyabi should be a good buy. You cannot beat a Forschner for value but those knives don't hold their edge long. Ceramic is too brittle. You can also consider the Gekko line at Japanese Chefs Knife that have the faux-damascus look: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html. I've used on of these and I found it was a very good performer for the price. If you don't want to sharpen your knives, they will get dull just like any others and we generally recommend whetstones, a professional sharpener with experience with Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Sharpening)/proprietor specializing in Japanese knives (Japanese Knife Imports).
    Those Gekko JCK INAZUMA are gorgeous. But unfortunately I don't see the 5.5" knife.

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