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Got my EP Pro
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Thread: Got my EP Pro

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Got my EP Pro

    It's really cool.
    Again I'm the guy with a 20-year old set of Henckels Four Stars that were always "sharpened" on one of those 3-wheel electric Chef's Choice (the glorified can opener).

    Please do not stone me; I have repented and seen the light.
    Last week I went to see Jon at JKI in Venice, California.
    I spent a couple hours with him and Sara and left with my first two real knives, but that's another thread I'll start soon.
    They are wonderful people.

    Now, I'm training on my new EP Pro with my old Henckels, which I will keep for the family to use.
    Ben sent me 220, 320 and 1000 (instead of 600) stock stones.

    The edges of my old Henckels are are all really trashed.
    I started today on the 260mm chef.
    I am first putting a 13 degree bevel on it, then (I think) a 20 degree bevel will finish it off.

    Right now I think I'm finished with the 3 stones at 13 degrees.
    I didn't even bother trying to approach a mirror finish since I think you guys told me it's a waste of time on these knives and it would be too slippery anyway.

    I didn't have a sharpie handy so I used a good jeweler's 10x loupe to guide the progress as I worked it towards the edge.
    The loupe worked very well since it is easy to see where you just exposed fresh metal.

    I intentionally did NOT take it far enough to make a burr; I stopped just short of that. (See pic below)
    It took forever with the 220 stock EP stone because I used very little pressure partly because I hear that slower and light pressure is best, and partly because I'm getting used to the new tool.

    Below is a pic of the 13 degree bevel and a couple of the leftover gouges which I belive the 20 degree edge will eliminate.



    What do you guys think?
    Should I move on to 20 degrees now or should I keep working at 13 degrees to removed these gouges?

    This is fun.
    I'm hooked!

  2. #2
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    Something else I noticed . . .
    The old edge was very much NOT uniform.
    I was careful to work both sides equally, both in pressure and number of passes.
    One side sharpened up to the edge MUCH faster than the other side.

    That's what I get for using a glorified can opener for 20 years.

  3. #3

    JBroida's Avatar
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    I`m telling you, hand sharpening is so much easier :-P

    Either way, i'm glad youre starting with the sharpening

  4. #4
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    I'm looking forward to learning.


    You're up late Jon.
    You should be

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgy Guy View Post
    ...One side sharpened up to the edge MUCH faster than the other side...
    This is actually normal. What you're not considering is as you are grinding one side, the other bevel is getting smaller as the edge comes down. This should happen every time your sharpen.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    That is a terrific photograph of the knife edge. I would like to be able to take photos of my knife edges like that. Can you tell me how?

    Thanks

    Keith
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  7. #7

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    The gouges are there because you didn't raise a burr.

    When the bevels meet each other through sharpening, they will form a burr. This is the nature of steel. Raise the burr, not huge, then flip it to the other side a few times, and remove it.

    When you come off your 220 grit stock EP stone, the deepest gouge on the edge should be the size of the largest particle in the 220 grit stone(so, scratch-deep).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    This is actually normal. What you're not considering is as you are grinding one side, the other bevel is getting smaller as the edge comes down. This should happen every time your sharpen.
    Again I intentionally did not raise a burr, so in this case I believe this is not true.
    If I was sharpening to the point I was raising a burr that would be true.

    Am I thinking correctly?


    Again, I read here somewhere when you are doing aggressive grinding to restore an old trashed knife and intend to end up with two bevels, you use your coarsest stone and stop just short of raising a burr.
    I'm at I I believe I am done with step one, the 13 degree work.

    Next, in step 2, the 20 degree work, which has not been started yet will get those gouges and of course I will be raising a burr at 20 degrees.
    I think the idea of not getting the burr at 13 degrees was to be conservative and save metal that didn't need removing.

    This was not my idea, I read it here, or it was on one of the Youtube videos someone here made.
    I'll look around and try to find where I read it.
    I was just asking you guys if gouges above [again this edge is only 13 degrees so far] are shallow enough to be addressed by finishing up at 20 degrees.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Neal View Post
    That is a terrific photograph of the knife edge. I would like to be able to take photos of my knife edges like that. Can you tell me how?

    Thanks

    Keith
    Thanks.
    I'm kind of a macro-photography nut.
    I'll post a pic of my set up soon after I get my coffee and walk the dogs.

  10. #10
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    So you are going for a 13 degree edge with a 20 degree microbevel? The bit about not raising a burr, I have seen it before but if you are only starting I wouldn't do that. Start by actually raising a burr, then when you can feel it very clearly you will know better when there is a tiny burr forming, so in future you will be able to stop sooner if you follow. I'd just get rid of the gouge at 13 degrees, before you put the microbevel on, any time I use microbevels I only use my finishing stone so this takes away very little metal.

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