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  1. #11
    Onions - I do radial cuts vertically and I cut horizontally for a nice dice. I think this is the fastest way. Although, my chef will dice the onion by making batons and then dicing it like that which i think is ridiculous but whatever

    Bell peppers - I roll them with out cutting the top or bottom off. The way I roll cut a bell pepper allows me to utilize as much of the pepper as possible and the only part left is the bottom which I cut after rolling it. If you do this right you can essentially skip the step of cleaning the ribs off of each panel of pepper.

    Herbs - I bunch them up into a little bundle, as tight as possible, then I rock chop.

    Fish Skin - I usually use whatever knife I have out whether it be my filet or my chefs/gyuto. I use a combo of sawing and pulling the skin while keeping the knife in one spot.

    Tomatoes - For concasse, I cut the tomatoes in half and squeeze the seeds out then dice it up.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Fish Skin: I use what ever knife is not blazing sharp, so whatever I just broke the fish down with. I move the knife, not the skin(that would never work on a sani-tuff).
    Actually, I learned to cut fish on a huge sani-tuff rubber board. A little moisture on the board may have helped (board was constantly wet with the fish we were cutting), but it most certainly can and does work on a sani-tuff board.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by MadMel View Post
    I also have some difficulty picturing radially cutting onions.. An explanation maybe?
    I also agree with not mincing for garnishes. Usually it's herbs that go into a marinade/rub that gets the mince treatment.
    Cut off the top and bottom of onion so there is no root left over. Put them on the board right next to each other, with the ends touching. I start with the one on the left, so the half on the right helps keep the slices from falling apart. The slices I make are usually less than .25" thick. I slice the long way, like parallel with the "equator" of the onion, not top to bottom. After I finish the half on the left, I pinch the sliced half and the whole half and spin them 180 degrees so the whole half is now on the left. I then slice that one the same way, right to left, letting the other onion hold the pieces. After they are both sliced, I usually cut one half at a time top-to-bottom to finish the dice.

    Did that make any sense? I can take some pictures/video instead.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  4. #14

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    Skinning a dolphin (mahi-mahi for you overly sensitive types) using the Key West dockside method. One cut behind the gills one lengthwise top and one bottom, short cut forward of the tail, grab the skin up by the gills with pliers, peel it off, take out the fillet with a Dexter fillet knife by running it under the fillet and connecting the original cuts for lack of a better explanation.........next!!!

  5. #15
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Something I was thinking about is the size of blade and how it changes techniques. I think if you use 270s they make push cutting a lot easier because obviously with a bigger knife there is more of a sweet spot. I find 240s suit me ok but I might get a cheapish 270 like a Carbonext to see if I like it. If you rock I think smaller knives are ok because you are basically using the whole length of the blade, not just one flat part

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    Skinning a dolphin (mahi-mahi for you overly sensitive types) using the Key West dockside method. One cut behind the gills one lengthwise top and one bottom, short cut forward of the tail, grab the skin up by the gills with pliers, peel it off, take out the fillet with a Dexter fillet knife by running it under the fillet and connecting the original cuts for lack of a better explanation.........next!!!
    This guy has done a few.

    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  7. #17

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    He left the skin on, but as you can see, if you have a sharp knife, the fillets pop right out. Our former captain used the typical Dexter knife, but he always had a basic water stone on the table.
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    This guy has done a few.


  8. #18
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    i dice my onions radially, it saves time
    bell peppers i stand on their ends and cut down the sides, no ribs seeds or coring needed.
    herbs I finely chiffonade and then rock and roll few seconds
    Fish sometimes i saw and sometimes I pull depends if I remember what i am doing. I use my chef knife most of the time.
    Tomatoes I do the same as the peppers and then take the cores and pulp and make sauce.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Cut off the top and bottom of onion so there is no root left over. Put them on the board right next to each other, with the ends touching. I start with the one on the left, so the half on the right helps keep the slices from falling apart. The slices I make are usually less than .25" thick. I slice the long way, like parallel with the "equator" of the onion, not top to bottom. After I finish the half on the left, I pinch the sliced half and the whole half and spin them 180 degrees so the whole half is now on the left. I then slice that one the same way, right to left, letting the other onion hold the pieces. After they are both sliced, I usually cut one half at a time top-to-bottom to finish the dice.

    Did that make any sense? I can take some pictures/video instead.
    I can slightly picture that but as I said I'm a visual person lol so vids/pics would be more of a help

  10. #20
    When I was apprenticing in hotel I would have to chop around 50-100 kilos of onions a week.
    I up-down rock chop them either if in dice or slice. For the start it was heavy job but once you get used to volume it doesnt trouble you anymore.
    Im peeling onion with paring, cutiing the just the top of the bottom part and the tail. Then cut in half and start off with the tail-end.

    "Conasse" just by cutting tomato into 4 pieces, insides out with a knife and i cut around to get rectangle shape. I would say around 12-15 squares out of each wedge from medium sized plum tomato - if I ever use them.

    Fish skinning with yanagi but more often gyuto, I dont move fish but the blade, looking slightly downwards, sometimes I would help myself moving the knife a bit to the sides.

    I never actually chop herbs anymore. I just slice them thinly stacked together. I hate oils/juices flowing out, so I try as neat cuts as possible without too much pressing.

    Peppers I turn around without cutting tops and bottoms first, as mentioned earlier. From hows capsicum built you can guess how thick the walls are and cut enough so theres no white parts left.

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