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Thread: Cutting techniques for optimized efficiency

  1. #21
    Senior Member Avishar's Avatar
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    I cut onions both ways actually, I am leaning towards radially because it seems to be more efficient, and the theory is right (onions grow in layers, not flats, so it would seem to make more sense). I do find I can get a fine mince easier with the standard cross cutting method. Do you guys like to slice horizontally first? It seems to make more sense to do that, but it also seems to mess up the vertical or radial slices, in terms of more pieces coming out when cutting.

    For shallots, I like cutting them in half, cutting vertical slices and then cutting crosswise to mince.

    Bell peppers I typically roll out, but I am finding that cutting panels gives longer strips and eliminates the need for cutting the tops and the bottoms seperately. Do you all like to stack the pile of strips (not calling it julienne to avoid offending people who use words for precise dimensions) or just do a pepper or two at a time? As long as its not a picky precision cut I find stacking them to work just fine!

    For large sides of fish like salmon, I like to use a ham slicer/salmon slicer or yanagi and hold it almost parallel to the board and use the natural rigidity of the skin along with a kitchen towel to pull it right off. For fish butchery I like a Deba or Western Deba.

    I don't do concasse as much, but when I do I like to splat the tomato half on the cutting board and the pulp comes right off! If I am doing a monder I like to cut the tomato lengthwise, roll it 90 degrees, cut it lengthwise, and line them up and cut them all with a sujihiki or slicer.

    I like cutting cubes of hard boiled eggs for a salad by pressing them through the side of a deep fryer basket, anyone else do that?

    And for parsnips and large carrots I like oblique cutting until I get to an unmanageable section, then cutting it into quarters and finishing

    I like splitting green beans, scapes and other items of that nature by using a paring knife or honesuke and splitting them off the board by using the stationary blade and pulling the product through it.

    Anyone here still do tourne where they work?

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Avishar View Post
    Anyone here still do tourne where they work?
    Fck no.



    I like your hard boiled egg trick, haha.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    i dice my onions radially, it saves time
    bell peppers i stand on their ends and cut down the sides, no ribs seeds or coring needed.
    herbs I finely chiffonade and then rock and roll few seconds
    Fish sometimes i saw and sometimes I pull depends if I remember what i am doing. I use my chef knife most of the time.
    Tomatoes I do the same as the peppers and then take the cores and pulp and make sauce.
    A little of topic but did you go to Sachem High School?

  4. #24
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    we still turn veggies sometimes

    stuck in the 70's

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avishar View Post
    Anyone here still do tourne where they work?
    Used to do it once in a while..

  6. #26
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    A couple of those things mentioned are in here.


    More peppers onions etc here.


    Fish


    More Fish.


    Even More Fish!



    Plenty more where that came from.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  7. #27

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    Cool videos, but the soundtrack fills me with the urge to go shoot up a fish market.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    A couple of those things mentioned are in here.
    Last edited by JohnnyChance; 08-15-2011 at 12:39 AM.

  8. #28
    I'd also appreciate a video or just a picture of the radial cutting. I can't quite visualize it just from reading it.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirkb View Post
    I'd also appreciate a video or just a picture of the radial cutting. I can't quite visualize it just from reading it.
    Look at the red onion in the second video. I think that's what you're asking about, anyway.

  10. #30
    That is the traditional onion, except Theory does the first set of vertical cuts before the horizontal cuts.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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