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Thread: Should I force a patina on new knife?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Yeah, I haven't used a Konosuke but I'm willing to bet, if it's anything like other higher-end White #2 knives, that you won't have discoloration on food. Nor will the steel itself be so reactive you really need to worry a lot about rust--I say cook yourself a lot of red meat for the next few weeks and "persuade" the patina.
    How does cooking red meat "persuade" the patina?

    It's not a trap.
    I'm not cool.
    Honest question from someone with 2 weeks of experience and only 35 posts.

  2. #22
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    The patina you get from meat has a funky bluish tint. Looks nice, and is a good base coat for the things to come.

  3. #23
    Different types of food cause different patinas to form. Medium-rare beef or duck, medium pork, cured but uncooked bacon (and other similar proteins) all produce blueish patinas that set in really well.





    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  4. #24
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    The blue streaks on this guy:




  5. #25
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    Great pics Jonny and Vertigo.
    Thanks guys.

    Hey, I should start a thread for Patina Pics.

  6. #26
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    I find that if I cut twenty pounds of Idaho Potatoes into french fries and leave the residual starch on the blade for about an hour or so and then rinse it of with cold water and my fingers my blade gets a very light beautiful blue grey patina on the blade. It last for quite a long time and only gets better with age. I don't have to worry about acid eating the edge. Apparently the same browning agent that oxidizes the potato will oxidize the knife. Some old time gun makers use to use potatoes to brown their barrels because it was less harsh and poisonous than the chemicals available, it takes time but its worth it. 240mm Hiromoto carbon gyuto

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgy Guy View Post
    Great pics Jonny and Vertigo.
    Thanks guys.

    Hey, I should start a thread for Patina Pics.
    Jim's already got one up & running:

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-patina-thread.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    I find that if I cut twenty pounds of Idaho Potatoes into french fries and leave the residual starch on the blade for about an hour or so and then rinse it of with cold water and my fingers my blade gets a very light beautiful blue grey patina on the blade. It last for quite a long time and only gets better with age. I don't have to worry about acid eating the edge. Apparently the same browning agent that oxidizes the potato will oxidize the knife. Some old time gun makers use to use potatoes to brown their barrels because it was less harsh and poisonous than the chemicals available, it takes time but its worth it. 240mm Hiromoto carbon gyuto
    I'm glad someone else pointed this out. I've read so many patina threads without seeing it... started to think I was a bit crazy but as a n00b/veggie I should be quiet. I've "grown" and destroyed a few patinas over time on French carbons. A rather pretty, colorful one comes from potatoes and maybe even prettier from sweet potatoes. It probably is a lot slower than from cutting bloody meat, though.

  9. #29
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    Would not covering the blade in a puree of one raw potato for 20 minutes (or the time it takes to cut 20 pounds into french fries) have the same effect?
    I'd hate to waste all that food.

    Maybe I'll do some experimenting with sweet potato puree, take a pic, clean the blade off with Flitz, then start over with another food and take more pics.
    Better yet, I could apply one inch of one food, the next inch of another food.
    A 10" blade could accommodate 10 different "paints" - actually 20 if I use both sides.

    I'm also an artist and the idea of using Hitachi White #1 as a canvas appeals to me.
    It's very edgy.

    So the list should include:
    Blood, from beef I assume
    Potato
    Sweet Potato
    Mustard
    Vinegar

    What else?
    Tomato?
    Citrus fruits?
    Pineapple?

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgy Guy View Post
    [snip]

    Maybe I'll do some experimenting with sweet potato puree, take a pic, clean the blade off with Flitz, then start over with another food and take more pics.
    Better yet, I could apply one inch of one food, the next inch of another food.
    A 10" blade could accommodate 10 different "paints" - actually 20 if I use both sides.

    I'm also an artist [.../snip]
    Ok, you're completely out of your mind, but you're my new hero.

    And you take amazing pictures, so please do this and share with us!

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