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Thread: a critique of sharpening technique

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Early training sticks.
    I have to agree. However, public schools are not exactly suited for this kind of teaching/learning. Not to get too off topic, but part of the inherent problem with public schooling is that there are no right answers when you have a room full of 35 kids and one teacher.

    And I never saw anything wrong with Alton Brown's logic--use them properly, care for them, and when time comes to grind on them, have a professional do it. If you want to learn, more power to you. But pro services are so absurdly cheap compared to the quality! What else is like that?

  2. #12

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    The impression that I have is that the true knife nuts want an edge so keen that if you think about a knife that you left at work when you get home, you will bleed a little bit. From the perspective of a pro, how fine does the edge actually have to be so that it isn't a hinderance to you getting your work done? What kind of stone will get you to that point if properly used?

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    The impression that I have is that the true knife nuts want an edge so keen that if you think about a knife that you left at work when you get home, you will bleed a little bit. From the perspective of a pro, how fine does the edge actually have to be so that it isn't a hinderance to you getting your work done? What kind of stone will get you to that point if properly used?
    Totally depends on the steel, the knife design, and what you are cutting.

    Basically, to imagine the difference between pro and home use, just amplify every aspect by 100-500. Cutting a chicken breast and it pushes the breast an inch before cutting? Not noticable at home. At work? Well, after about 80 chicken breasts it gets old.

    I used to be a minimalist, but now I really believe that pros need to have several knives, sharpened differently--the knife you use to bruinoise carrots is not going to perform the same on short loin, knowwhatImean?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    ...Cutting a chicken breast and it pushes the breast an inch before cutting? Not noticable at home...
    Uh... WRONG. I wouldn't want to put up with that. If you only get to cut one or two, why not make it a memorable experience?

  5. #15
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    It's always a bonus when a sharp knife is sitting around my kitchen at home. I generally don't sharpen them unless the wife asks. I'll use a butter knife before I sharpen a knife just to cook myself dinner.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    ...I'll use a butter knife before I sharpen a knife just to cook myself dinner.
    You didn't just write that...

  7. #17

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    I feel you.

    When I cook for other people, I pull out all the stops. I kick everyone out of the kitchen and swear and cook up a hurricane.

    When I cook for myself, a surprising amount of food product gets ripped/crushed with my bare hands.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    You didn't just write that...
    sure did, sure did

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post

    I feel you.

    When I cook for other people, I pull out all the stops. I kick everyone out of the kitchen and swear and cook up a hurricane.

    When I cook for myself, a surprising amount of food product gets ripped/crushed with my bare hands.
    Man that's called rustic LOL

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    The impression that I have is that the true knife nuts want an edge so keen that if you think about a knife that you left at work when you get home, you will bleed a little bit. From the perspective of a pro, how fine does the edge actually have to be so that it isn't a hinderance to you getting your work done? What kind of stone will get you to that point if properly used?
    I feel that a home cook(me) can take there edge's a lot steeper(sharper) to the point of almost being fragile,at least I do on some of my blade.I am prepping on my boardsmiths taking my sweet ass time so I don't have to worry about edge stability or retention.I am sure if some of my blade were use in a fast paced pro kitchen on a poly board they might chip fairly easy.So in the end I am just looking for the sharpest possible edge I take each individual blade I own.

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