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Thread: A potential sous-vide candidate?

  1. #11
    When you use a chamber vacuum sealer, you can seal liquids in the bag. They don't get sucked out.

    And when you seal items, you can see moisture boiling off as the vacuum increases.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  2. #12

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    If you see "boiling" then you are pressing the moisture out by squashing the food as opposed to boiling. To actually get water to boil at room temp (80F) you would need to have ambient pressure of .5 PSI. Considering that it only takes overpresure of around 2 PSI to blow out all of the windows in your house, I doubt that even a commericial grade pump could do that. You are evacuated as much of the "free" oxygen as you can, but as I understand it, foods that need to be refrigerated still need to be kept that way even in a bag.
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    When you use a chamber vacuum sealer, you can seal liquids in the bag. They don't get sucked out.

    And when you seal items, you can see moisture boiling off as the vacuum increases.

  3. #13
    The food doesn't squash. I have vac'd plenty of very delicate fish and it holds it shape just fine.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    The food doesn't squash. I have vac'd plenty of very delicate fish and it holds it shape just fine.
    From what I am reading, there is a technique called "instant pickling" where you take sliced fruits and veggies and intentionally "crush" the water out of the spaces and then repressurize by injecting your picling solution into the bag so that the "curshed" fruits of veggies soak it up like a sponge.

  5. #15
    Just because that is what you are reading, doesn't mean that is what we are talking about.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Just because that is what you are reading, doesn't mean that is what we are talking about.
    What you are talking about is sealing up food so that you can cook it for a LONG time a low temps and not have all of the internal moisture get cooked out, right?

  7. #17
    Basically. What does that have to do with crushing the water out and injecting a pickling solution?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  8. #18
    Senior Member goodchef1's Avatar
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    I thought we were talking about Eamon's beans? Regardless, sous-vide will eventually become mainstream, like the microwave, cd's, and plasma tv's. Might as well get in on the ground floor, while it's very expensive.

    If you look in the supermarket, more and more foods are starting to be sealed that way, and most canning will soon be a thing of the past. And with these new space aged packaging materials, microwaving will not be ideal, and cooking at specific times/temperatures in liquid will create best results.

  9. #19
    Senior Member BertMor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefwatson View Post
    Look... all I was saying is, sous vide is NOT a cooking technique. That is all! Sous vide is mearly the task of vacuum sealing something. Cooking with an immersion circulator is simply the act of poaching. Yes the circulator allows for a more controlled poach but, it is poaching nonetheless. You are still poaching something that is sealed in the bag... that just happens to be sous vide. The only time you are sous vide-ing something is when you are vacuum sealing it, not when you are cooking it.
    Actually, I think you might like to know that sous vide IS a cooking technique that goes back to the 1950's, in France. They were trying to shelf-stabilize food for the commercial world. The act of vacuum sealing does not make it sous-vide. you still need to cook it. and multiple methods can be utilized. I think because its so varied it constitutes its own cooking method.

    Of course YMMV just one cooks opinion
    Bert M.

    Why?! Because footballs don't have wheels!

  10. #20

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    What kind of proteins do you guys tend to prepare using this technique? How do they look when they come out of the bag and what do you do with them after they are cooked?

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