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Thread: Need help conceptualizing

  1. #11
    Senior Member BertMor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    I would not serve Chilean Sea Bass because of high cost. Also, it's not considered to be environmentally correct.

    If shipping is not an issue (which it doesn't seem to be because you initially chose Chilean Sea Bass), use Black Cod - it's sustainable, fatty, has a similar texture to Chilean Sea Bass and is probably less per pound. It's also a very prized fish in Asia.

    But, since you're in Florida, how about Pompano? I've cooked Pompano (smaller ones - less than 1 pound) and it's been great. It's got a rich flavor, delicate meat and it's local and a lot cheaper than Chilean Sea Bass.

    If you're going Chinese, how about a fried rice? The flavors in your dish seem to be salty, savory (black bean sauce), slightly bitter (bok choy), so you could use a little sweetness to the dish. Sweetness could come from a little Lap Cheong (Chinese sausage) sauteed in oil to render out some of the fat and sugar in the sausage into the rice.

    BTW, have you used XO sauce? It's been my recent go to sauce for steam and then oil searing fish because it's spicy, savory and pungent and a little sweet. But, you could also use this to flavor your fried rice.

    Or, how about using oyster sauce (or other sauce) to lend a sweet component to the vegetables and ditch the starch? Bok Choy is a very filling veg.

    +1 to the Taro idea. Steamed and fried taro cake with XO sauce is a staple of dim sum. I don't know if you'll like the texture if you've never had it since it's a little gummy, but it's definitely authentic.
    Quote Originally Posted by dreamsignals View Post
    how about a crispy noodle cake? it would probably be nice to offset the potentially gooey texture of the bean sauce (potentially, not sure how you're gonna make it) and add some crunch
    Not a bad thought. The sauce is basically a small amout of sugar caramalized with some secret aromatics (wink) added and finished with rice wine vinegar. Its actually a thin syrup in texture

    Let me think on noodles..........Hmmmmmm a good idea
    Bert M.

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  2. #12
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    +1 on the crispy noodles!
    Spike C
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  3. #13
    Senior Member BertMor's Avatar
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    Anybody vote for fried scallion bread? Too greasy?
    Bert M.

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  4. #14

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    If you can get it, how about using wahoo? Local, but sometimes a bit scarce yet mucho tasty even before you start doing your magic on them. Also found in the Pacific, so easy to fit into your Asian theme.

  5. #15
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    i'd have to say greasy...the fish is already going to be buttery/fatty. something with a drier texture would be better...to capitalize on my own recommendation for crispy noddle cake, you can incorporate other ingredients into the noodle themselves when you fry them and they'll become part of the 'cake', like scallions or the sausage suggested above (that you could crisp up in advance).
    -thiago

  6. #16
    Senior Member BertMor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreamsignals View Post
    i'd have to say greasy...the fish is already going to be buttery/fatty. something with a drier texture would be better...to capitalize on my own recommendation for crispy noddle cake, you can incorporate other ingredients into the noodle themselves when you fry them and they'll become part of the 'cake', like scallions or the sausage suggested above (that you could crisp up in advance).
    I really like this idea, and I LOVE crispy noodles, but don't you think that this is also greasy/oily? If only lentils or couscous with mint and preserved lemon went with this....damn idea won't get out of my head, gonna have to save it for another dish
    Bert M.

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  7. #17
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    i see...well, to keep the ideas going: the noodles will tend to absorb less fat/oil than the bread and will also drain better onto a towel. if you crisp up the sausage and pat them, shouldn't be a problem. it'd be more like bacon bits, just more 'exotic'. you could bump up the acidity through some citrus to cut through the oil/fat. a little juice in the sauce, maybe zesting some as well...
    -thiago

  8. #18
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Could go for a fried noodle cake or something lighter like this [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by BertMor View Post
    Some interesting ideas....and I did ask not to be convicted on the CSB Black Cod or Pompano hmmmm, this a high end off-site caterer, I'm not sure how that will go over. But that is definitely a proper choice to consider for a restaurant

    I think ya missed the part of the CARAMEL-Preserved Black Bean Sauce, it has lots of sweetness.

    I am not familiar with XO sauce, what's it like?

    The bok choy is going to be steamed then sauted with peanut oil-sesame oil combo and finished with chx stock, soy and sambal with a garnish of sesame seeds. I find oyster sauce a bit overwhelming most of the time. But I will consider it.

    Taro cakes sound interesting but its like okra, lots of people don't like it much, and this is not the time to experiment.

    I could do fried rice, it probably would go over well.....Whats a good substitute for Lap Cheong?

    Good stuff people this is dcefinitley helping my thought processes
    I saw the caramel part, but didn't want to assume how sweet it would be, especially because preserved black bean sauce can be quite overpowering.

    XO sauce is made from a combination consisting usually of dried scallops, chili peppers, oil, garlic and possibly dried shrimp, or dried fish. It's extremely savory with a little spice. It can be used to sauce many dishes.

    I haven't substituted Lap Cheong but would imagine it could be replaced with any similar semi-dried, slightly sweet asian sausage; I recall eating a Filipino sausage that had a similar flavor. You could also substitute Chinese bbq pork (Char Siu), or even ham. A Chinese ham, Jinhua ham, is cured in a similar manner to a southern country ham, except for the smoking.

    I love fried scallion bread, but it's something you eat with your hands. It seems a little out of place from the fish and vegetables you're making. However, tt doesn't have to be greasy. Just don't pan fry it in a bunch of oil like they do in Taiwan.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BertMor View Post
    Anybody vote for fried scallion bread? Too greasy?
    That's exactly what I was going to suggest! Only around these parts we call them Sichuan green onion cakes, as long as we're talking about the same thing. They don't have to be greasy either, just brush them with oil rather before frying.

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