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Thread: Tojiro Powder Steel

  1. #21
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    Review of Tojiro HSPS 240mm gyuto

    I thought I should review this knife, which I bought as a gift.

    Purchased at K&S. James put an edge on it- not sure if it was because I told him it was a gift, but thanks.

    It comes in a neat box, with a soft plastic sheath. The blade was oiled on delivery- Im not sure if James did that or it came like that from Tojiro.

    It weighs about 230g. Satin finish looks buffered as one would expect in a mass produced knife. 242mm cutting edge. 48-49mm height. 2mm thick spine is mostly maintained until ~80% toward the tip, then there is a nice distal taper. It has a fairly flat spot for the first half of the blade with a gentle upward curve after that then quite a high tip (but nowhere near as much belly as a Shun or a Wustie). Not my favourite profile but probably more familiar to the recipient.

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    The grind is quite good, with a gentle convexity and reasonably thin behind the edge.

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    The F&F is not perfect, but given the price point, not too bad. The big yo handle isn't completely flush with the bolster or tang but this is being pretty picky. The spine and choil are downright sharp- quite uncomfortable but easy enough to fix with a bit or wet and dry.

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    I compared it to my Shiro Kamo Syousin Suminagashi, my current favourite all round knife.

    On carrots, the Tojiro performed well but made its presence felt a little more in carrots than the Shiro Kamo, while also having slightly worse food release. On zucchini (courgettes), performance was similar but the Tojiro had slightly worse food release. On onion, both performed well but once again, food release was not as good with the Tojiro. Notably, the tip coped quite well with onion. On bacon (with rind), the knives were similar, the Tojiro maybe a touch less capable. Interestingly, the Tojiro had superior food release with bacon.

    Overall, it's not as good as my Shiro Kamo (which is in itself a brilliant value knife) but is in the same ballpark, with a lower price.

    I would have loved to compare it to my old Ryusen Blazen, but I don't have access to that knife at the moment.

    I obviously can't comment on sharpening (James- can you?) or edge retention (but one would expect this to be substantial given that this is a PM tool steel).

    I think that overall this knife is stellar value and a pretty good introduction to Japanese knives. A good grind, high tech steel and OK F&F. It does suit someone who is used to a German profile a little more than some knives. I guess the only caveats are that HSPS may not be the ideal steel to learn to sharpen on (but it is probably better than VG10 I suspect) and the spine & choil need a bit of attention (the spine was noticeably more uncomfortable than the Shiro Kamo).

    Thanks for reading.
    "My greatest fear is that when I die, my wife will sell my knives for what I told her they are worth"

  2. #22
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    I have a takamura hana R2 that I've had for a few years, and sharpened a few times. I sharpen at 10-12 degrees, it gets stinky sharp and holds it for a long time. I don't think that's too acute for the steel.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nemo View Post
    Marek, I'm definitely no sharpening guru and although I have an interest in steel metallurgy, I'm not an expert in that either. My understanding is that carbide pull-out is microchipping caused by carbides being pulled out during use. It's more likely in highly alloyed steels with large carbides (I'm guessing tool steels including PM steels and many alloyed SS are in this category). It's more likely if the angle at the very edge is greater than that particular alloy can support. For example, I have been told that 14dps is far too acute for SG2 (which is hardly the most alloyed PM steel). Carbon steels and fine-grained SS with fine carbides (such as AEB-L) don't tend to have this problem, even with very acute edges. Microvbevelling is often suggested to counteract this problem.
    I'm not sure the extent to which this is based in theory vs empirical evidence, but some guys who seem to have a lot of sharpening experience place a lot of store in it, so I guess that it's based in their experience, at least.
    I'd very much welcome the input and perspective of those who know more.

  3. #23
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    If it was with oil then I gave it the edge. I always use oil to wipe off everything regardless if it was stainless or not.

    James

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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkjames View Post
    If it was with oil then I gave it the edge. I always use oil to wipe off everything regardless if it was stainless or not.

    James
    Yeah, I was pretty sure it had the K&S edge. 😁
    "My greatest fear is that when I die, my wife will sell my knives for what I told her they are worth"

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevpenbanc View Post
    I have a takamura hana R2 that I've had for a few years, and sharpened a few times. I sharpen at 10-12 degrees, it gets stinky sharp and holds it for a long time. I don't think that's too acute for the steel.
    Thanks Kev.

    I must say that I haven't myself noticed poor edge retention at only slightly less acute angles. I did start another thread on this topic and had a few different opinions.
    "My greatest fear is that when I die, my wife will sell my knives for what I told her they are worth"

  6. #26
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    Thanks Nemo for the little review. I have been a an Tojiro DP advocate for casual home users for a number of years. Bought a handful of them as gifts and recommend them all the time. The HSPS seem like a perfect step up from the DP line. Even though I don't have a need for one, I might have to get one to try out against my old trusty DP gyuto just to see the difference.

    Cheers,
    rj

  7. #27
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    I don't have any other Tojiros, so I'd be happy to see the comparison, Skewed.
    "My greatest fear is that when I die, my wife will sell my knives for what I told her they are worth"

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