Quantcast
Cutting Boards
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Cutting Boards

  1. #1
    Senior Member welshstar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    487

    Cutting Boards

    Is there a link for the differences in cutting boards ?

    As a novice i just use one of the commercial grade plastic boards, ive just got a feeling this is not right !!

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,227
    There's some info on David's site: http://www.theboardsmith.com/purchase.htm. I have a pile of boards and I like my BoardSMITH boards the best by far.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockport, TX
    Posts
    4,892
    Here's a generally-accepted order of board desirability, from worst to best(not just for how they treat your knives):
    Glass
    bamboo
    Poly
    Foldable plastic
    edge-grain wood
    high-quality end-grain bamboo
    sani-tuff
    end-grain wood
    Boardsmith



    What kind of knives are you using, and what are you cooking?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St. Petersburg, FL
    Posts
    1,297
    You forgot to put "leftover piece of granite or Corian from when you had your countertops installed" in that bottom part of the list.
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Here's a generally-accepted order of board desirability, from worst to best(not just for how they treat your knives):
    Glass
    bamboo
    Poly
    Foldable plastic
    edge-grain wood
    high-quality end-grain bamboo
    sani-tuff
    end-grain wood
    Boardsmith



    What kind of knives are you using, and what are you cooking?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockport, TX
    Posts
    4,892
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    You forgot to put "leftover piece of granite or Corian from when you had your countertops installed" in that bottom part of the list.
    Please God no.

  6. #6
    Senior Member welshstar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    487
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Please God no.
    The builder actually took the time to shape and polish a peice for me.

    Dont worry it has never been out of the garage, its handy for cutting and drilling !!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    346
    aren't sanituff boards like... on par with end grain in terms of edge retention? I like how they stop your knife rather than it sliding too, builds good technique IMO.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,475
    i own a pretty nice end grain board (wasn't nice when i got it, but it's nice now), and i've used nice end grain boards, and i have to say that i really like my edge grain John Boos at least as well.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    San Anselmo, CA
    Posts
    10

    maple cutting board help

    While I am reading and learning about Japanese knives I wanted to get started with some new equipment and a cutting board seems to be a worthwhile item.

    I am looking at three boards:
    Boos Block edge grain at WS 15 x 20 x 1-14 10 lbs. $50
    Boos Block edge grain 15 x 20 x 1-1/2 12 lbs. $67
    Boos Block end grain 15 x 20 x 2-1/4 21 lbs. $144
    Boardsmith end grain 14 x 18 or 20

    I want to choose a board for overall long term satisfaction. Will the heavy end grain boards prove to be cumbersome every time I move them from the counter?

    Are the end grain boards that much better then the lighter (thinner) edge grain boards?

    I do light cooking for myself for the most part. Should I be looking at a smaller size?

    Advantages/disadvantages of the Boardsmith board vs the Boos Block?

    I love to buy quality tools that will last for the long term and give the greatest satisfaction and ease of use.

    Thank you,
    Steve

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rockport, TX
    Posts
    4,892
    Welcome, Mr. Stephens!


    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Stephens View Post
    Will the heavy end grain boards prove to be cumbersome every time I move them from the counter?
    You don't move them around the kitchen. Basically instead of your board being a scooping tool that you cut on, it is more like a counter that you cut on. It doesn't move around, because it doesn't need to. Some folks use a thin plastic "cutting board" to transfer food from board to pot, but it's annoying to me to clean it every time and keep up with them. I just use my hands, I'm only feeding my family. Either that or I grab the CCK1303. It's worth losing the habit of running around the kitchen with it and sacrificing counter space for the improvement a good end-grain board provides, for your knives, your safety, and your eyes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Stephens View Post
    Are the end grain boards that much better then the lighter (thinner) edge grain boards?
    Not all of them. End-Grain bamboo has a ton of glue in it that is hard on edges, and lesser-quality end grain boards are disposable goods, warping and cracking over time. But end-grain means that the knife will dig into the board(saving the edge, and stopping the knife from slipping), but the cut will heal(preventing nasty gouges). Also, contaminants have been found to sink into the board, and the grain traps it in a dark vacuum and disinfects itself, to some degree. They are quieter to cut on, and look way nicer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Stephens View Post
    I do light cooking for myself for the most part. Should I be looking at a smaller size?
    If you want to save money more than have the space to work with. I always say get the biggest board your counter can fit. I got out a ruler, and asked my wife what is the most space she is ok with losing on the counter forever, and got a board that big. Whether you are feeding 1 or 100, you only cut up one onion at a time, it's just up to you if you want to have to deal with crowding on the board.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Stephens View Post
    Advantages/disadvantages of the Boardsmith board vs the Boos Block?
    I don't know if Boos makes different lines, or if they just changed over time, but the Bed Bath & Beyond variety are known to warp, crack, split, etc over about a decade(my folks have a butcher block...an actual table...from Boos and it's 4 decades old--not sure if quality has gone down or what). That's just sitting on the counter, even if you oil it. It is because the wood has residual moisture in it, different amounts of moisture, poor construction, etc etc. The difference between a run-of-the-mill cutting board(no pun intended) and a Boardsmith Board is night and day. It's a permanent purchase, and will outlive you. If you have any problems with it(which you won't), Mr. Smith is fantastic in his dealings with customers.




    Unless you are looking for something to throw away in the future, just buy the Boardsmith. You will not regret it, they are fantastic. I've not seen a single board that comes close to it. There may not be a "best knife", but IMO there is a "best board".

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts