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Thread: which zwilling j a henckel knives?

  1. #11
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    You're gonna need to do something about sharpening. The best knife is still a POS without a good sharpening job. You need to decide if you want something very stainless or if you mind some minor discoloration or if you are okay with carbon steel.

  2. #12
    Here's my picks for you, keeping in mind that you are on a very tight budget:
    Sani-Tuff Board 15x20 : $40
    Idahone Ceramic Rod : $25-30
    Ditch the bread knife, if you want a bread knife that bad, get the Tojiro DP bread knife, it's like $60.

    Your main, go-to knife(A 'Chef's knife', or it's Japanese equivalent, the 'Gyuto'), submitted for your approval, in order from most most budget conscious to bang-for-the-bucks(though none are a lot of care at all):
    Tojiro DP ($80 alone, matching Petty is $50, Parer+Chef's is $100)
    JCK Carbonext ($105 alone, matching Petty is $66)
    Hiromoto AS ($145 alone, matching Petty is $72)
    Murray Carter SFGZ Funayuki ($190 alone)

    I priced them for the 210mm, which is 8", because that is what, in my experience, most home cooks want/need. When they inevitably get dull(about 4 months to a year from purchase, depending on how hard you are one them and how sharp you like them), just send them out for professional sharpening. Unless, of course, the sharpening stone bug bites you. Which it might.

  3. #13
    I really do plan on taking care of a good knife. (Sharpening, hand wash & dry). Never thought it was worth it or even possible to sharpen these things correctly being very thin and serrated. I was thinking stainless to keep them looking like a nice knife.

  4. #14
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    I say if you like Henckels, there are a few good options. Check out the Miyabi line. The MC line is top notch. Also, the Henckels Twin Cermax is bad a$$, with ZDP189 steel hardened to 66...

    But, if you're open minded, these guys will guide you to the cream of the crop.....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  5. #15
    The Hiro AS is a carbon core with stainless cladding, an attempt at the 'best of both worlds. They certainly do look nice.

    Sharpening is not so much a sign of care as a new life skill. If you want to learn to do it, you CERTAINLY can, and you don't have to spend over $100 in sharpening stuff all told(though you easily can if you like it). I'd say cross that bridge when you get there. It'll be a while before you will want to take them to the stones.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    It'll be a while before you will want to take them to the stones.

    unless you become crazy like us... then a factory edge usually just won't do!

    Tojiro dp's are all good. F&F (fit and finish) isn't amazing. but it'll do. If you are interested in carbon they also have the shirogami (white steel) line. which will soon include a wa-gyuto (japanese chef knife) a wa-petty (japanese utility) and already includes a nakiri and santoku.


    Johndoughy's list is a fantastic starter list. if you are interested in carbon steel tho look at the knives mentioned above. only difference I would say is don't get the tojiro DP bread knife. get the Tojiro ITK bread knife.

    The tojiro ITK bread knife is supposed to be fantastic (highly used and I think reviewed by theory). Its part of my next purchase!

  7. #17
    So basically, I don't need to inventory too many knives. And it sounds like these Japanese knives are way better than the Henckels? If I dont need as many, maybe I can splurge a little. Is there another notch up in quality to look at. Really want to make the right choice, but without overdoing it of course. Thank you guys so much for your guidance. I have much to look at and learn.

  8. #18
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    I also like the list. If you want something that is very stain resistant and you're willing to spend a bit more, my choice would be Ashi or Konosuke stainless (Japanese Knife Imports). These are significantly better cutters than Tojiro and I like the steel better. It chips much less and the edge stays keener longer. If you think you might like something a bit more substantial-feeling, I really like Yoshihiro for a wa-handle (also from JKI) or Masahiro MVH for western (only the Knife Merchant version). With regard to sharpening, I'd get a cheap fine grit diamond plate from Lowes and go to town on whatever knives you've been using. Just work on maintaining your grinding angle/keeping your bevels nice and even. By the time your knives need sharpening, you can jump into whatever whetstones you want or you'll know you gave it a shot and send it to someone (not just any pro sharpener) for sharpening.

    If you want to go even better, go for the Ashi-Gesshin line but depending on what kind of user you are, the difference in performance vs the regular Ashi might be negligible. It just doesn't get that much better regardless of price.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by mjbakos View Post
    So basically, I don't need to inventory too many knives. And it sounds like these Japanese knives are way better than the Henckels? If I dont need as many, maybe I can splurge a little. Is there another notch up in quality to look at. Really want to make the right choice, but without overdoing it of course. Thank you guys so much for your guidance. I have much to look at and learn.
    You won't need as many knives because a good knife will do a lot of things for you. At home, you can get by with 2--a short one and a long one. Though if you love to cook, you'll want more!

    Japanese knives in general(included the massive amounts of factory garbage that never get exported) are about the same as anywhere else. But they do offer better quality at a lower price point than most anywhere else. A knife made from comparable steel from an American factory costs about 4 times what a Tojiro does.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I also like the list. If you want something that is very stain resistant and you're willing to spend a bit more, my choice would be Ashi or Konosuke stainless (Japanese Knife Imports). These are significantly better cutters than Tojiro and I like the steel better. It chips much less and the edge stays keener longer. If you think you might like something a bit more substantial-feeling, I really like Yoshihiro for a wa-handle (also from JKI) or Masahiro MVH for western (only the Knife Merchant version). With regard to sharpening, I'd get a cheap fine grit diamond plate from Lowes and go to town on whatever knives you've been using. Just work on maintaining your grinding angle/keeping your bevels nice and even. By the time your knives need sharpening, you can jump into whatever whetstones you want or you'll know you gave it a shot and send it to someone (not just any pro sharpener) for sharpening.

    If you want to go even better, go for the Ashi-Gesshin line but depending on what kind of user you are, the difference in performance vs the regular Ashi might be negligible. It just doesn't get that much better regardless of price.


    Spending a bit more can get you a knife that blows budget factory stuff like Tojiro out of the water(which is saying something, if you are coming from German knives).

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